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Masking Canopies
goldstandard
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California, United States
Joined: March 29, 2007
KitMaker: 208 posts
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Posted: Sunday, April 01, 2007 - 11:47 AM UTC
Hi there, I am a bit new to this forum. I started modeling again a month or so ago after a break of about 7 or 8 years. Now that I can buy my own stuff instead of begging mom to buy my supplies and kits I want to take modeling to the next level. I have been reading all the information I can but to be honest I just can't seem to get masking the cockpit down correctly. either the mask gets pulled off because the excess that I trim off is still connected by a tiny corner, or paint rolls in underneath an edge no matter how much I try to rub it down flat, or the tape just falls off. I keep hearing how Parafilm M is the business, but I can never find it anywhere. Any suggestions?
Emeritus
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Uusimaa, Finland
Joined: March 30, 2004
KitMaker: 2,845 posts
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Posted: Sunday, April 01, 2007 - 06:56 PM UTC
I haven't tried parafilm, but if you ask my recommendation for tape, it's Tamiya's masking tape. Really good stuff, sticks well yet easily removed without leaving adhesive stains even after weeks.
The key to succesful tape masking is a fresh sharp blade in your hobby knife. A dull edge easily tears the tape when trimming or won't cut completely, leaving those annoying tiny left-overs.
The method I use is to minimize the amount of trimming I have to do. I do this by masking the edges with thin stips of tape, then using bigger piece(s) to fill in the center. This way you only have to trim ends of thin strips, they're both easy to cut and will ensure straight frames. Masking curved lines is also easier with thin strips (several, if needed), than putting on tape and following the frames with a knife, IMO. (I always make mistakes and have to try again, resulting in many ugly knife marks in the clear parts)
The only trick I know for avoiding paint bleeding under the tape is to burnish the edges (cocktail sticks are good) just before painting and avoiding putting on too thick coats of paint over the masked areas. This is especially important when painting with a brush, it's easier to control the thickness of the coats with an airbrush but care is still needed to avoid bleed-unders. As always, several light coats are better than one. If you're painting with a brush, using a little thicker paint as well as multiple coats is likely to help.
Then before removing the tape, it's a good idea to lightly score around the masked areas to cut through to paint which has sticked to the tape. Without this procedure, the tape can easily take chips of paint off from the frames as you pull it off, especially if the paint has been given plenty of time to cure.
trahe
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Virginia, United States
Joined: April 03, 2006
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Posted: Sunday, April 01, 2007 - 10:33 PM UTC
I've used frisket film with pretty good success. I whole-heartedly agree that a fresh blade is key. One method I heard about to prevent bleed-unders is to dip the canopy in Future and let cure. Mask, then spray with Future and let cure. This will seal the mask and any bleed under is clear Future. Then paint whatever color you are going to paint. When removing the masks, you have to then re-score the edges with a sharp blade. Haven't yet tried this with canopies, but it sounds like a reasonable plan... You can use this same technique when masking for different colors. Paint the base color, mask, then paint the base color again on the edge. Paint the second color, score, and unmask. I have done it like this, and it worked great.
SGTJKJ
#041
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Kobenhavn, Denmark
Joined: July 20, 2006
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Posted: Monday, April 02, 2007 - 06:15 PM UTC
Welcome back to the hobby.

I also use Tamiyas masking tape and a sharp knife. Much better than other types of tape.

It has worked well so far, but I have only tried it a couple of times on aircraft.
goldstandard
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California, United States
Joined: March 29, 2007
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Posted: Friday, April 06, 2007 - 03:04 AM UTC
Thanks for the advice. I just finished a P-40 and the mask had no bleed unders, and turned out fine. the technique of scoring the edges before removing the tape works wonders, I think I will try that for other masking jobs too. I notice that far too often I get jagged edges because of thin paint tearing off along with the tape.
WingTzun
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Illinois, United States
Joined: February 01, 2006
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Posted: Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 04:55 AM UTC
Is it possible to use liquid masks for canopies?
goldstandard
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California, United States
Joined: March 29, 2007
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Posted: Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 06:05 AM UTC
I don't know. I have a spare canopy I could test it out on though. I'll try it out today and let you know what the results are.
Red4
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California, United States
Joined: April 01, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 10:03 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Is it possible to use liquid masks for canopies?


Short answer, yes. I use this in conjunction with the Tamiya tape. I use thin strips around the frame work, and fill in the remainder with the liquid mask. The suggestion of applying a sealer such as Future before painting is also a good idea., although I haven't had a problem with the Tamiya tape pulling away as yet...knock on wood The thinner the strips of tape you can get, the tighter the curves you will be able to follow. Good luck, and welcome back to the hobby. "Q"
goldstandard
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California, United States
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Posted: Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 11:30 AM UTC
Thannks for the info red. I went ahead and tested the clear mask, and your suggestion of using tamiya masking tape definately looks like the better option. What I tried was the instructions on the bottle where you paint the film over the whole canopy, then cut away the mask on the parts you do want painted. The main problem with this method is that when applying the mask it can obscure delicate frame lines, making accurate removal of excess film all but impossible.
Red4
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California, United States
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Posted: Saturday, April 07, 2007 - 08:22 PM UTC

Quoted Text

The main problem with this method is that when applying the mask it can obscure delicate frame lines, making accurate removal of excess film all but impossible.

Yep. "Q"
Emeritus
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Uusimaa, Finland
Joined: March 30, 2004
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Posted: Sunday, April 08, 2007 - 04:33 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

The main problem with this method is that when applying the mask it can obscure delicate frame lines, making accurate removal of excess film all but impossible.

Yep. "Q"


That's right sherlocks!
When masking canopies with straight or either lightly curved frames, you can use the best properties of both masking mediums by using thin strips of tape to mask the frames, then applying liquid mask to fill the centers.

I usually only use liquid mask alone for tightly curved sections of canopies which can't be masked with tape.
I don't know about other brands, but vallejo's liquid mask is very sticky when dry, making cutting with a knife hard without lifting or tearing the edges. And disposable applicators are a must, since the stuff ruins brushes. (but if you want and can use brushes, that's okay then...) Getting a straight line will be tricky.
I suppose you could probably use tape, apply the liquid mask, then immediately remove the tape to get a straight edge to it, but that kind of kills the purpose of that liquid mas...

My recommendation is thin strips of tape for the edges, larger pieces for the centers, liquid mask if you want. And a sharp knife.
The_Migrant
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Alberta, Canada
Joined: March 13, 2007
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Posted: Monday, May 21, 2007 - 06:48 AM UTC
I use Parafilm almost exclusively to mask canopies. It takes a little getting used to, but has two big advantages over some of the other methods it's semi-transparent so it's easy to see the frame lines, and it doesn't leave any adhesive residue. It clings best to clear-parts that have previously been dipped in Future (once it's hardened!), and needs a brand-new Swann Morton No. 11 blade to cut cleanly.
Flyboy_RO
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Bucuresti, Romania
Joined: May 30, 2007
KitMaker: 35 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 05:59 PM UTC
I maybe excused but I have noticed one thing: don't and I emphasize DON"T use Future and afterwards Maskol or Color Stop or any masking liquid based on amomnia (NH4). THe ammonia will remove the Future rom your canopy ASAP and there's no telling how much damage it will do.
I personally use Tamiya tape and MAskol, but I don't apply Future at all, or I do but at the latest stage, after my whole model is decaled, laquered meaning almost finished.

All the best to you...!!!
29Foxtrot
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Victoria, Australia
Joined: September 19, 2003
KitMaker: 708 posts
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Posted: Tuesday, June 05, 2007 - 05:26 PM UTC
Welcome back into thehobby.

I use the Tamiya masking tape on canopies, using these three steps.

1/. Apply the masking tape.

2/. Use a 0.5mm technical pencil, to draw along the framework, then rub down with a cotton bud, [refered too as a Q tip by most members].

3/. Cut out the excess tape from the frames following the pencil lines, using a new scalple blade.

Hope this helps a little.
_H_Dori
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: November 09, 2006
KitMaker: 295 posts
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Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 09:07 PM UTC
Hi guys

Just another quick question regarding this topic. How do you guys paint the inner canopy frames?
Now, on my last model I used the Eduard masks on the inner sections to paint the frame then transfered them to the outside. This was ok but not really ideal so I was thinking about another way around it and thought that maybe some of you might mask the outer section and spray or paint the inner colour on the outside before the primer and camo colours.

Does that make sense?
What are your thoughts, and thanks in advance.

H
TedMamere
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Moselle, France
Joined: May 15, 2005
KitMaker: 5,653 posts
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Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 09:29 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I was thinking about another way around it and thought that maybe some of you might mask the outer section and spray or paint the inner colour on the outside before the primer and camo colours.



Hi Howard!

That's how I do it...

Jean-Luc
MLD
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Vermont, United States
Joined: July 21, 2002
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Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 10:35 PM UTC
I'll toss in my US$0.02 for using bare metal foil.
It's more expensive in the long run, and you still need a very sharp blade, but for those kits where the frames are not as pronounced and it can be difficult to 'find' the edges with thicker Tamiya masking tape, I find it works wonders. You need to work in small sections and use a sharp knife too.

It can leave a bit of a residue, but using the product "Goo-Gone" adhesive remover has worked very well with that and not harmed the Tamiya or Gunze acrylics I've used.

As for inner frames, same advice. Paint the interior color first, then the exterior.
_H_Dori
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: November 09, 2006
KitMaker: 295 posts
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Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 10:43 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Hi Howard!

That's how I do it...

Jean-Luc



Fantastic Jean-Luc thats just what I was hoping to hear. I appreciate your answer and I'm glad you could understand what I meant.

Thanks

H
CRS
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California, United States
Joined: July 08, 2003
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Posted: Monday, July 16, 2007 - 02:41 AM UTC
Point of caution Metalizers (Model Master or Alclad) can / did attack / eat their way through liquid masking.
JWViguers
Joined: April 08, 2007
KitMaker: 7 posts
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Posted: Monday, December 10, 2007 - 12:37 AM UTC
I use Bare Metal Foil (it's the best) and if you see some residues, clean them off with WD-40. It's simple.
Roxter
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Rigas, Latvia
Joined: July 04, 2007
KitMaker: 268 posts
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Posted: Friday, December 14, 2007 - 01:07 AM UTC
I use either precut masks or thin stripes of tamiya's masking tape and then follow bigger pieces of masking tape (mt). thin strips of tamiya's mt adhere better to the surface and curvy lines of canopy frames.
eerie
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United Kingdom
Joined: September 26, 2004
KitMaker: 1,008 posts
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Posted: Friday, December 14, 2007 - 12:10 PM UTC
I find this topic beneficial to me. I manage to mask my 1/72 A-4 canopy with the mask and cut method.