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Cold War (1950-1974)
Discuss the aircraft modeling subjects during the Cold War period.
Hosted by Tim Hatton
Best Starfighter Ever?
magnusf
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: May 02, 2006
KitMaker: 1,803 posts
AeroScale: 1,752 posts
Posted: Monday, October 14, 2019 - 08:16 PM UTC
Steve! Beautiful work, it is a bit like Brian's B-17: even if I never would have the stamina to pull through such a project there is lots of things both to learn and enjoy!

In a few days you're hitting two years with this build...





Magnus
SteveAndrews
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 03, 2019 - 09:30 AM UTC
Hi Magnus,

Oh my gawd. Two years? No wonder my stash keeps calling to me. I don't know about my best build ever but this is my longest.

Thanks for keeping me company. I'm happy you're enjoying it and learning as I am too.

Happy modelling,

Steve.
SteveAndrews
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 03, 2019 - 09:31 AM UTC
When I was a kid a film called ĎThe Land that Time Forgotí grabbed my attention. These days itís more a case of the detail that manufacturers forgot. I spent some happy and not-so-happy hours replicating the details inside the avionics bay lids, and Iím nearly done. I finally managed to find the right size drill bit to drill out the ends of the sidewinders too. Iíll make some clear seeker heads later. It all looks like this.





Oh, and that film

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0K97czqecQ
SteveAndrews
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 10, 2019 - 09:03 AM UTC
Thereís a story about a massive engineering project. The aim was to build a highway through a mountain. The best engineers with the best equipment were sent to do the task. Even so the start was slow as the team formed and they learnt about the equipment. But as the days went by progress became faster. Everyone got to know each other and their tools. Soon everything was working at peak efficiency and the team smashed all records for their work rate. Finally, after weeks of effort the big day came and they broke through to the other side of the mountain. The champagne was readied and everyone felt proud. But just as the corks were about to pop a lone voice was heard at the back of the crowd.

ĎWait!í He said. ĎThat was the wrong maintain.í

The moral of the story? Pride comes before fall, or maybe donít get so engrossed in a task that you lose sight of the big picture. Wish Iíd remembered that before I glued the nose on and forgot to weight it. Iíve been so focused on minute details that I forgot something basic. Luckily I managed to manoeuvre a big blob of white glue into the space behind the instrument panel and pour in Deluxe Miniatures Liquid Gravity. It seems to have done the trick.

Back at the detailing Iíve been adding PE parts to the fuselage around the electronic bays and also test fitting the front of the cockpit. Iím glad I did that before gluing the inside area with the HUD in place because the fit is very tight. I canít get everything aligned. Maybe itís my fault, but I think sanding the edges back a little and then repainting them will be needed. It might actually be the multiple layers of paint I put on in the first place that is causing the problem. Thereís PE to go in too, which will be a squeeze. The photo shows the interior stuck inside the canopy part. Itís not glued.

Slowly but surely weíre edging towards a finished kit. Maybe weíll be ready for paint by Christmas??





Happy modelling guys.
SteveAndrews
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 - 06:59 AM UTC
Cold, wet Sundays: I love Ďem. Mr Blue Sky isnít around to tempt me out, so the very best thing to do is get some serious work done on the F-104. Today that meant detailing up the cockpit edges and adding a few simple scratch built details inside the front of the canopy. There are some extras provided in the Eduard PE set but they are so thin and flimsy I opted for plastic card instead. I even managed to get some paint on. Crikey!

Here are pics and mood music.





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMtarj8Ua0s
SteveAndrews
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 01, 2019 - 09:31 AM UTC
I spend a lot of my time with magnifying glasses on. They are - of course - great for detail work but lousy for peripheral vision. I blame them entirely for a clumsy swipe that sent the F-104 sliding across my desk, which in turn broke the front landing gear. Damn, damn and more damn. It seems like I have a crisis in every build. Last time I managed to split the windshield on a Mirage and spill glue all over the wing.

After a few moments of disbelief and then frustration I took a look at the damage. Luckily the part broke neatly and I can repair it. Iíll remove the piston between the upper and lower strut, drill out both parts and put a new piston in from plastic rod. Hopefully that will make a strong new link.

Al that happened just as I was feeling good about finalising the cockpit details and getting the windshield (carefully) glued in place. A little brush painting and weathering got the area ready. It was hard to figure out where the interior grey stops but in the end references helped and thereís a lip that makes the perfect line of demarcation.

Here is the progress and first stage repair (damn, damn and damn):











Happy modelling guys.
GazzaS
#424
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Queensland, Australia
Joined: April 23, 2015
KitMaker: 4,264 posts
AeroScale: 1,820 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 01, 2019 - 10:27 AM UTC
Keep up the good work, Steve. Your efforts are paying off. We all have crisis points. Just this weekend, on the verge of completing my ICM Dornier Do 217 night fighter an act of clumsiness cost me all four of my new Gaspatch FuG 212 radar aerials. They couldnít be salvaged. Fortunately I bought 3 sets.

Gaz
SteveAndrews
_VISITCOMMUNITY
England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: August 16, 2010
KitMaker: 629 posts
AeroScale: 489 posts
Posted: Monday, December 02, 2019 - 12:23 AM UTC
Hey Gaz,

Thanks for the encouragement, and I'm sorry to read about your Dornier. You are a sensible man for buying extras!

Maybe there's room for a section here on fixes and crisis management :-)

Bye for now,

Steve.
Stickframe
#362
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: December 01, 2013
KitMaker: 1,455 posts
AeroScale: 2 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 07, 2019 - 03:32 PM UTC
Hi Steve,

I enjoy dropping in from time to time to see your progress - really something else to see - really nice work. This time tho - Iím glad that you report your periodic disasters - not to mean Iím glad they happen, but because it reminds us that weíre not alone with them!

Just before reading this I spent the afternoon working with white metal, metal rods, and turned metal parts and springs on the rear end of a 1/24 Porsche 908/3 race car....the parts were not agreeing to go together, at all - when, the white metal lower control arm snapped. Perfect. A clean snap at the chassis....automatically, broken suspension.... So, I tore that side of the suspension apart, made a clean cut at the break, drilled out both of what were one piece, and inserted a small metal rod and rebuilt it....and now, Iím going for a beer - need to de-stress from a day at the hobby!

Thanks for posting - I really enjoy seeing your work

Cheers
Nick
AussieReg
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
#007
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Victoria, Australia
Joined: June 09, 2009
KitMaker: 6,772 posts
AeroScale: 3,542 posts
Posted: Sunday, December 08, 2019 - 12:13 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Maybe there's room for a section here on fixes and crisis management



Not enough bandwidth to cope with the torrent of posts on that subject matter Steve!

I'm still sticking my head in to have a look here from time to time, loving the work you've been doing and the effort you put in to display it all here is very much appreciated.

Nick, I thought you would be enjoying this build, it's a louder, pointier version of the work you have been doing over on Automodeler.

Cheers, D