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Cold War (1950-1974)
Discuss the aircraft modeling subjects during the Cold War period.
Hosted by Tim Hatton
Italeri 1/32 Mirage IIIc
MichaelSatin
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Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 02:57 AM UTC
Steve,

Be very careful that the instrument panel slots correctly into the fronts of the upper side panels. If it doesn't, it will interfere with the fit of the windscreen later (ask me how I know).

Michael
GazzaS
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Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 12:17 PM UTC
Hi Steve,
When it comes to paint, I'm a 'scale colour' fanatic, too. I'm wanting to test scale black on an all-black night fighter some day.

As far as what to do when a kit goes wrong, I have one waiting for inspiration to continue. A 1/48 scale limited run Reggiane Re-2005, and a warship. Warships are for very detail-oriented modellers. The Reggiane needs new control surfaces and might be beyond my laziness.

Best wishes and keep up the beautiful work.

Gary
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 02:42 AM UTC
Hi Guys

Joel, I guess we all served our apprenticeships as boys. I seem to remember a few success as well as casualties, perhaps an early Tamiya 1/25 scale panther with motors, and an Airfix (?) Spitfire, also with a motor. I also remember model shops, which seem to be disappearing fast. My inspiration came from the Tamiya catalogue and Francois Verlinden's dioramas. At the time they seemed like unachievable things of exquisite beauty.

Michael, thanks very much for the warning. I'll take extra care and do a lot of dry fitting. Sounds like discovering that wasn't fun. Ouch. Sorry to read it.

Gary, We're unanimous. Dark grey is the new black. These days I try and keep the failures. Sometimes I raid them for parts, but more often I find time heals a lot of wounds and they can revived. I say 'can' because well, I feel your dilemma. Sometimes the mojo just isn't there.

Talking of mojo, Photobucket and my computer seem to have fallen out. I'll load some progress shots as soon as I persuade them to make up and talk.

In the meantime, here's a musical interlude to help keep us in the mood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IO7nAMYhaI

Happy modelling guys.

SteveAndrews
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Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 - 07:39 PM UTC
A long time ago on a workbench far, far away, someone noticed that even a seemingly uniform colour changes tone and saturation across its surface. These days colour modulation and all its variations are standard operating procedure for armour modellers. Aircraft modellers have adopted a different range of techniques. I wonder if you can mix the two?

In an attempt to find out Iíve decided to adopt some simple modulation on the interior. To that end you can (just about) see some variation in tone on the instrument panel. The left and right sections have been hand painted in a lighter shade of blue/grey, as have a lower panel. Iíve done the same with some of the nest of wires and details in front of the instrument panel. I did the little bit of modulation now simply to make the brush painting easier. There is more to come. It does. of course, mean Iíll have to mask the instruments etc, when Iíve assembled the rest of the cockpit. And that will be the next step.

Hereís an attempt to capture the variations on camera. It proved a little tough so I went outside, and it made a bit of difference. Sorry about the slightly shaky shots. And no I wasn't contemplating jumping to rid myself of sandpaper finish forever. I live in a fifth floor flat.



GazzaS
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Posted: Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 01:33 AM UTC
Steve,
Your painting helps highlight the details. I'm building a tank and have been using some of my plane modelling techniques to reach the result I want. Many of the affects will get covered by mud...but hopefully some will be seen,

Cheers,

Gary
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 02:52 AM UTC
Hi Gary

It would be great see some shots if you feel like sharing. It seems to me that generally speaking (and of course I am generalising) aircraft modellers have concentrated on getting a good finish whereas armour modellers have traditionally spent more time working on weathering techniques. Somewhere in the middle there has to be a great union. Maybe you've found it!

All the best

Steve
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 08:22 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Gary

It would be great see some shots if you feel like sharing. It seems to me that generally speaking (and of course I am generalising) aircraft modellers have concentrated on getting a good finish whereas armour modellers have traditionally spent more time working on weathering techniques. Somewhere in the middle there has to be a great union. Maybe you've found it!

All the best

Steve



Steve,
I built armor for a few years before I came back to aircraft modeling, and the one biggest eye sore was the overkill of weathering on models not in a diorama. I just never could see the point of painting a armor piece with the exact colors, adding rust, and color modulation, then covering so much of the model up with dirt, mud, earth, etc. that you never saw half the finish. I took a much lighter approach to weathering, much more like you would find on a well worn aircraft.

Joel



SteveAndrews
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Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 12:37 AM UTC
Hi Joel

That's a neat Sherman, and your techniques paid of well it seems to me. I tend to attack armour with weathering a bit more just because it does get grimy and I like the grime. However it's each to his own of course, and there's no right or wrong way, just the way each of us likes.

Thanks for posting the shots here. Its alway an inspiration to see other people's work.

Have a great day

Steve
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 12:43 AM UTC
Thereís something about brush painting that appeals to the twentieth century man in me. And a change of plans in the construction sequence gave me an opportunity to break out some brushes. Having thought about the best way to paint the cockpit I decided it was better to get some detailing done before assembly. Iím also about to order Airscale decals to complete the dials, and decided it was better to do the decalling while the instrument panel was still free.

So armed with a fine brush and Vallejo acrylics I set about enhancing some more of the details. One way of doing this would have been dry brushing, and itís a good way. However I wanted more control so I used a version of dry brushing. My Method is to load the brush with thick paint and apply at a 90 degree angle to the surface I want to highlight. I use the sides of the bristles not the tip. In this case wanted to highlight the wires. The technique needs a light touch, but I like the way it feels to do it and I like the end result. I used three different tones of grey to get some gradation, the lightest being reserved for wires furthest from the base. In addition I picked out a few details and added some other colours. My reference shows a good deal of labelling and different materials, so thereís room to add a few colours once this coat is dry. Next will be a gloss coat and then a final oil wash of black



Iíve been thinking ahead to the final choice of colour for the exterior, and Iím so tempted by a bare metal. It just feels to fit the period. Iím also wary of the pitfalls. So, I decided to experiment and went back to one of those projects on hold - an Eduard F104G. I masked off the wings and gave the rest of the body a coat of the new(ish) Vallejo Metal Colour Duraluminium. Iíve seen some good reviews, and I have to say the result looks good to me. What you see here is applied straight to the plastic. Its increased my confidence, and I reckon I will attempt the bare metal finish. The yellow tint is my lighting and camera getting all goldy-looking. The actual result doesn't have a hint of yellow.





What do you think, and do you have any advice that might avoid problems?

Thanks for looking in guys.
MichaelSatin
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Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 01:22 AM UTC
Looks good! I'm going to go with bare metal but I put a coat of glossy black primer down first. Helps to even the surface and ensure I got everything. Looks very cool while it's black too!

Michael
GazzaS
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Posted: Monday, January 25, 2016 - 06:21 AM UTC
Hi Steve,
Here is an illustration of how I'm using things I've recently learned to do with aircraft on a tank. Bear in mind that I'm only newly back into the hobby so I'm a newbie at everything but spilling paint.


Image 1 is four road wheels arranged in a star pattern with the shaded bit pointing outwards.

Image2 is the same wheels with their shadows all facing downward with the shading underneath the wheel boss, bolt heads, and wheel contours.

To do this, I painted the wheels black first, then sprayed them the base camouflage color from one direction at about a 45 degree angle while they were still on the sprue.

Image 3 is the zimmerit on the turret and underside of the barrel sprayed from underneath at about a 45 degree angle.

Image 4 is the top of the turret shaded around any detail and given a squiggle to add texture over the open area.

Image 6 is proof that sometimes I can't count with the base coat over the black on the front of the tank to see how it would look. The real black stuff at the bottom is my first work of Ukrainian mud which is seen as quite dark on internet photos.

My main hope is to limit the need for washes and to keep shadows more natural. Some tank models you see with zimmerit are dominated by it, so I'm trying to go the other way. The gloss is caused by the artist acrylic paint to which I add a large amount of Future to make it more robust.

Again, it's all learning and experimentation. Fun, though it doesn't keep me from cursing when something goes amiss or when the carpet threatens to devout yet another small part.

BTW...on your NMF, have you considered aluminium foil?

Best wishes,

Gary




SteveAndrews
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 01:35 AM UTC
Hi Michael

Yup, I reckon I'm going to use the Force and go for the BMF. A OK! I hear what you say about a black undercoat. Wow, metallics really highlight every tiny construction blemish.

Hey Gary

Go your own way! There's a vast amount of advice on technique and tools today, and its mostly great but sooner or later we have to decide on what's right for us. It will be great see more of what you achieve, and I really like the artificial shadows. I've seen guys use this on aircraft interior to great affect, and it looks like you are making it work on your Tiger.

As for foil, no I hadn't. I might need to practice first, that would be a real new adventure for me. Have you tried?

Happy modelling guys.

Steve
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 01:39 AM UTC
Adding some highlights and colour to the instrument panel has made the details pop. As youíll know by now if youíve been following this build, I don't worry too much about exactly replicating each dial, button and light. I try and get the general feel right.

The technique here was simply to carefully highlight some raised buttons with light grey and pick out a few warning or indicator lights in, well, warning or indicator light colours like red or orange. I used a couple of reference pictures, to get an idea, but as one was in black and white and the other showed a different layout I decided I couldn't be Ďaccurateí even if I tried. Finally I went around some of the edges with a pencil to add some interest.

I have Airscale decals on order. The Swiss postal system will deliver them in true Swiss style; methodically and slowly. However Iíve been wondering if prominent cockpit dials will enhance or degrade the look. Sure, theyíll add detail but will they confuse the eye? An alternative option is to gloss coat the surface of the dials and stop. Maybe Iíll decided when the decals arrive. Any votes from you guys?





As you ponder, hereís a little ditty for folks building the South African version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5y7WWhayhQ
GazzaS
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 11:39 AM UTC
Hi Steve,
Aqain, I have to admire your ability to make small details look great! My return to modelling has only been a year or so, but in that time I've built three aluminium skinned aircraft. All three links will take you to the completion photo page of the selected aircraft. This is my journey:

My First

My Second

My Third

I'm working my way up to a 1/48 scale B-29.

Best Wishes,

Gary
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 01:05 PM UTC
Hey Gary

Thanks for the links to your work. I'm impressed. Wow, you did a great job with the foil finish, and it really does achieve something that metallic paints struggle to.

Now you've done it and got me wondering if I should try the same. I'm going to read your blogs from start to finish. The Mirage is a pretty simple shape, and big, so it would be a good place to start. There's a challenge with the plastic though. It has a slightly grainy texture. I wonder if the foil would hide that or make it worse?

Decisions decisions.

All the best

Steve
GazzaS
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 02:36 PM UTC
Hi Steve,
Thank you very much!
It is true that the foil shows every flaw. The tiny squiggly mote of dust will show. I generally give the styrene a light sand with either 1200 wet/dry or 1500, if I hadn't already had occasion to sand. Though to be honest, I've never dealt with a pebbly surface.
And though every flaw will show and demand fixing, once your model is struck by sunlight, you'll be glad of your choice.

Best Wishes,

Gary
Joel_W
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Posted: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 10:19 PM UTC
Steve,
another excellent update.

I've only done one full NMF aircraft, a P-38, and it was certainly a learning experience. I did use Alcad gloss black base, and it works perfectly, but I had some issues with getting it to lay down smoothly. I found that shooting it just like Alcad metallics gave me the smoothest and glossiest finish: 2-3 inches from the surface, and a flow rate of approx. 12 psi.

I do like your dry brushing technique, as I've used the same method with excellent results.

As for the IP, just glossing the instrument faces that were painted black in 1/32 scale, would jump right out at the viewer that there are no instrument faces. I would certainly vote for the Airscale decals as they're excellent. You won't be disappointed.

Joel
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 02:02 AM UTC
Hi Gary and Joel

So, here's the real benefit of writing blog like this - free advice from people who know.

Gary your foil work is inspirational. I might try it on something that I've invested less time in first, just in case I mess it up. I think even my shrink might struggle to get me back out of spin if I got to that far with this kit and then botched it.

Joel, thanks very much for your tips and thoughts on the dials. I hear you about the Airscale decals. I'll pause here until they arrive and shift my attention back to the other cockpit and landing bay parts. They almost feel like a different kit now. I've spent a while focussing on the instruments.

Work and life are likely to interfere with progress for a day or two, so sorry in advance if things go quiet. I did tell my boss that work was getting in the way of my hobby but he didn't seem to be sympathetic. Maybe he's a railway modeller and just doesn't get aircraft?

a bientŰt.

Steve
GazzaS
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Posted: Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 11:36 AM UTC
Hi Steve,
To each his own. There is nothing to fear. Because you work in panels, if you mess up a panel you just peel/scrape/ lightly sand until the foil is gone. Wipe the glue off with isopropyl, and do it again.

Now, if a Rihnoceros Beetle flies into your paint shed and lands on your painted , still drying NMF, then you've got problems.

As for your blog, we'll be here.

Best Wishes,

Gary
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Thursday, January 28, 2016 - 04:07 AM UTC
Hey Gary

That's a wonderful image. Maybe there's a book in it - one that hasn't yet been covered by AK Interactive? 'Improbable Modelling Disasters and How to Fix Them.'

Chapter 1. Rhinoceros Beetles in your paint. Easy fix - just use AK's new acrylic Rhinoceros beetle remover.

If we see it on the market we should ask for a fee.

Have a great day.

Steve
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Saturday, January 30, 2016 - 04:21 PM UTC
What would you do if you had a time machine? Maybe travel back and see the dinosaurs? How about visit the future and marvel at the new toys humanity has invented? You might even grab your digital camera and go get those perfect reference shots of an old vehicle? Me, Iíd go back about a week and clean my airbrush.

You remember the trouble I had with sandpaper finish? Well it turns out it wasn't just the air pressure. My airbrush was dirty and I didn't know it. I was prompted to find out when it spat an unholy blob of Tamiya clear onto the instrument panel of the Mirage. I let it dry, and it then looked like a dry unholy blob of Tamiya clear. After a few moments of doing quite a good impression of my five year old daughter when she is told she has to eat her carrots, I calmed myself and decided on two things. I was going to have to strip the paint off the panel and strip down my airbrush.

Now, Iíve been following the advice Iíve seen on some quite reliable internet modelling shows (yes, yes, I know) and just flushing through my airbrush with cleaner after each use. I used to give it a little strip down too, but I stopped. I shouldn't have. What I discovered was a nozzle and tip with a good few layers of old acrylic attached. Clearly my cleaning method and cleaning products hadnít done the job. This called for the nuclear option, so I reached for this:



There isn't much short of Chobham armour that can resist this stuff. It even dissolves the will of telephone sales people. So I made a little bath for the small parts and reached for my favourite cleaning tools - a paintbrush, q-tips (aka as cotton buds) and cotton thread. I use the paintbrush to get into nooks and crannies and the thread I use like a pipe cleaner, drawing it through small places. The q-tip is a great swab. You get the picture in the shots below.







And here is what came out.





The Mr Thinner also attacked the paint of the instrument panel. As I had already retreated this far I decided on a full tactical withdrawal and also took the sandpaper ejector seat back to square one. Now its time for a coffee and a come down from the thinner induced high I am on. When the pink elephants have left the room Iíll use that beautiful clean airbrush to put down a beautiful clean paint job.

Who needs a time machine when you have deja vu?



Oh, by the way, those lovely Airscale decals arrived. Just in time to lay down on the layer of clear I messed up (sob).



Happy modelling guys.

Steve.
GazzaS
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Posted: Saturday, January 30, 2016 - 11:04 PM UTC
Hi Steve,
Welcome back from your work enforced absence. Sorry to hear about your airbrush woes. At least now you know how y got themysterious pebble effect.

Cheers,

Gary
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 12:51 AM UTC
Hi Gary

Thanks very much. I'm pleased to be back, especially now I've sorted out the pebble dash look. I tried out the airbrush by painting the front wheel well walls. Et voila, now that's how it should be. Phew.

I used the AK Extreme Metal range. First a black undercoat and then a few coats of Dark Aluminium. I angled the airbrush and applied more coats to the areas at the open end of the wheel well to create some artificial shadow. That looks and feels so much better.



Have a good day.

Steve
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 03:11 AM UTC
Steve,
Glad to see that you solved your AB problems. I never just run cleaner though any of my ABs. Just changing colors, yes. End of a session the cleaning procedures are somewhat different in terms of cleaners based on the type of paint I used. At a min I clean the bowl, then pull back the needle so that I can gently hold a Qtip soaked in the appropriate thinning agent, and turn the needle to get the paint off, then I remove it through the back. That way I'm not pulling any crap into the guts of the AB.

Then I clean the bowl and cone using those soft plastic flossers just gently pushing to front of the cone but not through. The final steps is running Iwata cleaner through the AB without the needle. Swab out the bowl, and then clean the front where the two caps are. Last step is to replace the needle after a drop of oil rubbed on it. Sounds like a lot of work, but takes me about 5 min.

Joel
SteveAndrews
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Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2016 - 05:11 PM UTC
Hi Joel

Yes, wise words. I used to do something similar before I discovered the new advice. Needless to say I'm now back to doing a better clean up. Sometimes the best advice is our experience, eh? Nice tip about the tooth flossers!

Have a good day.

S