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remove small fragile parts from sprue
Battleship_Al
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Washington, United States
Joined: October 25, 2009
KitMaker: 133 posts
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 03:24 AM UTC
What is the best way to remove small fragile parts from the sprue? I am tired of the parts breaking and having to fix them. Is a fine razor saw the best tool for the job?
Heatnzl
#435
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Nelson, New Zealand
Joined: February 14, 2013
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 04:44 AM UTC
Since I been using a pair of Italeri side-cutters I have found small parts easy to remove whole from the sprue and even for trimming. Doesn't matter if the plastic is hard or soft.

Cheers

Karl.
Battleship_Al
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Washington, United States
Joined: October 25, 2009
KitMaker: 133 posts
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:15 AM UTC
Thanks Karl, I will get a pair. I picked up a couple of Wingnut Wings kits and want to do them the justice they deserve.
SgtRam
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
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#197
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:50 AM UTC
I have both, and much prefer the razor saw for real fine fragile pieces.

Joel_W
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New York, United States
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:56 PM UTC
Believe me, I sense your pain and frustration with snapping small parts in an effort to remove them from the sprue trees. I've tried everything I could think of, and a fine bladed saw is the best method.

The trick is to support one side of the part so that it doesn't snap back and break or bend. Also, use as little pressure as possible on the blade, just making light even passes, that really helps.
Joel
Battleship_Al
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Monday, June 15, 2015 - 10:17 PM UTC
I have some of those saw blades that look like No. 11 X-Acto blades. I will give those a shot when I get back to the work bench.
Joel_W
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New York, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 08:34 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I have some of those saw blades that look like No. 11 X-Acto blades. I will give those a shot when I get back to the work bench.



I'm not too sure just how fine those blades are. I use fine saw blades that I purchased from Sprue Brothers.

Joel
drabslab
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European Union
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Posted: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 10:32 PM UTC
Often, the fragile parts break because they are caught on two sides in between sprue that is more solid than the part that is in between.

When cutting the sprue remains in place and the fragile part has to give away to the thickness of the cutting blades.

One trick that I use often is to cut one end of the sprue free before cutting the fragile part. This way the sprue can move away freely without putting pressure on the part
18Bravo
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 08:54 PM UTC

Quoted Text


One trick that I use often is to cut one end of the sprue free before cutting the fragile part. This way the sprue can move away freely without putting pressure on the part



+1

You can also use a heated blade on parts that prove to be brittle. A lot of DML's older kits were like this. Using the heated blade will eliminate the snapping or bending action of the part. Afterward, clean up with a file.
Joel_W
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New York, United States
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Posted: Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 10:34 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Often, the fragile parts break because they are caught on two sides in between sprue that is more solid than the part that is in between.

When cutting the sprue remains in place and the fragile part has to give away to the thickness of the cutting blades.

One trick that I use often is to cut one end of the sprue free before cutting the fragile part. This way the sprue can move away freely without putting pressure on the part



I've tried the cutting of the sprue trees with limited success, and still rely on a fine saw blade. Never heard of heating a knife blade before, but it sounds like a easier and quicker method then the saw. Going to give it a try.
Joel
PatrickG
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Canada
Joined: August 18, 2015
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Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - 07:43 AM UTC
I'm about to start on a Tamiya 1/48 Storch (not sure if the brand/kit makes a big difference), and I'm hoping to get through it with a stack of exacto blades, a zippo, and a pair of surgically sharp swiss army knife scissors.
The work surface will be a large square of cork board, or perhaps cardboard.
Am I being naive or will that be a workeable (if not ideal) set-up?
FWIW this is my first model since I was a kid, and unconcerned with/having parental help for the most difficult cuts.