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Pencils for panel lines?
Toad-In-The-Hole
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Taipei, Taiwan / 台灣
Joined: February 23, 2014
KitMaker: 44 posts
AeroScale: 38 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 01, 2014 - 08:33 PM UTC
I read this tip on a modelling website that a mechanical pencil can be used for panel lines. Has anyone here ever used that technique (which sounds much easier and less risky than using paint imo) and how did it turn out?

Also, is there certain lead that you need to use? I'm guessing the thinner and darker the lead the better?

Hope I'm not abusing my "start here (for beginners)" posting privileges and annoying everyone with my questions! It seems to only be me making new topics here

Cheers

Jack
ScrapIron
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 19, 2014
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Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 12:53 AM UTC
I have used this in the past. One uses engineering mechanical pencils, which can be obtained in very thin diameters, like .03mm.

I stopped using the technique because I personally got better results with pre-shading techniques, and I felt the individual lines were too stark, too sharp. Not a complaint - it does work well - just did not give the effect I personally desired.

Regards -

- Dave
Toad-In-The-Hole
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Taipei, Taiwan / 台灣
Joined: February 23, 2014
KitMaker: 44 posts
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Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 01:26 AM UTC
Cheers

I'll see if I can pick up any uber-thin engineering pencils here in Taipei. Unfortunately the nearby model shop didn't have any, but I'm certain I'll be able to find one somewhere.

Thanks
ScrapIron
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: January 19, 2014
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Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 02:02 AM UTC
It took me a while to find one, too. Model shops do not carry them. I had to special order mine through an art supply store.
epshifty
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England - North West, United Kingdom
Joined: August 05, 2011
KitMaker: 376 posts
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Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 06:48 AM UTC
I use artist pencils to pre-shade i use 3B this gives a nice deep line that can be seen after painting also you can smudge the pencil lines to get a more dirty look around the panel line area .. heres some examples
 photo P2055_30-08-12.jpg

 photo preshade_zpse7bde00e.jpg

 photo 2013-08-20213613_zpscb401f11.jpg

Hope this helps
Toad-In-The-Hole
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Taipei, Taiwan / 台灣
Joined: February 23, 2014
KitMaker: 44 posts
AeroScale: 38 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 04:26 PM UTC
Those look great.

So, you recommend to do the panel lines before painting? The website I saw the tip on using pencils said afterwards but, if doing it before gives a better effect (which it seems to do judging by the photos) then I will do that.

If doing the panel lines before, do you need to redo them afterwards, just to highlight them a bit more? Or does doing it just once before painting work fine?

Got a Revell Mig-15 freshly bought that will be my first panel-lined model so hoping to figure out how best to do it before I begin.

Cheers
bdanie6
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Florida, United States
Joined: November 09, 2008
KitMaker: 615 posts
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Posted: Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 06:56 PM UTC
I use the technique all the time. I use a regular mechanical pencil that I bought a Office Depot, that uses #2 lead. (Regular Graphite)

This is a SkyRaider that I finished recently



If you want, you take a look at my build blog and follow an straight out of the box build of the Revell A1-H Sky Raider here

http://aeroscale.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=211330#1775421

And remember, this is a hobby, so just have fun!

Later
Toad-In-The-Hole
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Taipei, Taiwan / 台灣
Joined: February 23, 2014
KitMaker: 44 posts
AeroScale: 38 posts
Posted: Monday, March 03, 2014 - 03:04 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I use the technique all the time. I use a regular mechanical pencil that I bought a Office Depot, that uses #2 lead. (Regular Graphite)

This is a SkyRaider that I finished recently



If you want, you take a look at my build blog and follow an straight out of the box build of the Revell A1-H Sky Raider here

http://aeroscale.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=211330#1775421

And remember, this is a hobby, so just have fun!

Later




Thanks!

That Sky Raider looks great. I'll have a read through the build blog later tonight. Thanks for the link.

I managed to get one a mechanical pencil today and did the panel lines on my new Mig-15 and it looks much better than leaving them blank. Gonna do the painting tomorrow.



I always have fun. Model making is so relaxing after a long day teaching
epshifty
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England - North West, United Kingdom
Joined: August 05, 2011
KitMaker: 376 posts
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Posted: Monday, March 03, 2014 - 11:20 AM UTC
Hi Jack to answer your question yes i do the panel lines before i paint but remember to use a soft leaded pencil to get a dark line .. im guessing you use an airbrush ?? as im not sure if this will work if your just brush painting .. either way you can use a fine pencil after painting in the panel lines to enhance the effect
Joel_W
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
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New York, United States
Joined: December 04, 2010
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Posted: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 02:28 AM UTC
Jack,
You didn't mention if you were using the lead pencil for pre or post shading.

I've used from time to time a #2 lead mechanical pencil for panel lines. The issue I've had with that technique is that if the recessed panel line is very narrow, you tend to shade the entire panel line right to the top, which makes it generally too dark, and too pronounced.

Two positives about the technique is that it's not a solid black color, and it's very easy to control.

I started using black for pin washes on armor which works well, but after several aircraft models I felt that it was just to stark and unrealistic. I've started mixing shades that are just darker then the surface color for a more natural look.

I do my pin washes post painting as part of the weathering process. I'm not a big fan of pre-shading because I either get it too dark & stark, or way to light to be next to useless.

Joel