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World War II
Discuss WWII and the era directly before and after the war from 1935-1949.
Hosted by Rowan Baylis
What lately left my assembly line
BlackWidow
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Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 - 01:18 AM UTC
Finished earlier this month I finally have time to show you the newest member of my aviation museum, the Dornier Do 215 B-5 Nightfighter from Revell (ex ICM) in 1/48 ....




.... the Do 215 was planned as the export version of the Do 17 as Yugoslavia was interested to buy and build it under licence. The prototype was powered by 2 BMW Bramo engines but the flight characteristics were no good enough for the yugoslavian commission, so the plane was not ordered. Dornier decided to change the engines with Daimler Benz DB 601, which showed a noticeable improvement to earlier prototypes. In late 1939 Sweden ordered 18 Do 215 but due to an export embargo of the german government the order was cancelled and the Luftwaffe took over the planes. The Do 215 was a very versatile aircraft used as a bomber, nightfighter, intruder and for reconnaissance. It had a crew of 3 (pilot, navigator, gunner) and was powered by 2 DB 601 engines with 1175 hp each. The maximum speed was 485 km/h in 4000 meters. The usual armament were 4 x MG 15 (7,92 mm). The B-5 nightfighter version had a "Kauz III" called nose equipped with IR searchlight for the Spanner infrared detection system. It was also armed with a 20 mm MG FF plus additional 2 x MG FF in a container under the fuselage. There were only 12 B-5 nightfighters converted from the B-4 version and all used by the NJG 2, based in the Netherlands. Another wartime user of the Do 215 was Hungary ....






.... I have built R4 + SN from the 5./NJG 2, based at Giltze-Rijen in the Netherlands in 1941/42. This aircraft was flown by Oberfeldwebel (Sergeant, later 1Lt.) Paul Gildner. He was born in 1914 and entered the Wehrmacht in 1933. In 1937 he changed to the Luftwaffe to become a pilot. WW 2 began for him as a member of ZG 1 and pilot on a Bf 110 during the Poland Campaign. During the air battles over France he achieved 4 kills. After the campaign in the west he was trained to become a nightfighter pilot. His first night victory (a Handley Page Hampden) he achieved on the 3. September 1940. On the 9. July 1941 he was awarded the Knights Cross. During 1942 he continuously added kills to his tally which made him one of the most successfull nightfighter pilots of the first half of WW 2. In the early morning hours of the 25. February 1943 when returning from a mission he died in a crash shortly before arriving at Giltze-Rijen with a Bf 110 G-4. The crash was caused by a burning engine. In total Paul Gildner achieved 44 night- and 4 day kills. He is buried today on the german war cemetery in Ysselsteyn/Netherlands ....





.... building this kit is a bit tricky. Though it's nicely detailed, especially in the cockpit, I came across some annoying fitting issues. So the nightfighter nose doesn't fit well to the fuselage without major surgery on it. I had to erase the "fitting ring" completely and did a lot of test fitting before I glued the nose to the fuselage. There is not much space left to use filler because of the clear parts on the underside of the fuselage. So it was just carefull sanding I could do. Another problem zone is the wings/fuselage area. Just behind the canopy occures a gap which could compete against WW 1 trenches. Here I used clear tape and my self mixed filler (glue and flour). After a lot of sanding I was satisfied with the result. A step shows up at the rear end where the wings meet the fuselage. No filler here but again carefull sanding not to loose the details. It's still visible but that's acceptable for me. The same problem is on the underside. More gaps and steps which I had to battle against the best I could. Because I have closed the engines I had to fight another problem with the top covers. On both was a small hole on the rear end which looks to me like a mould fault. Some more filler and sanding here. So you see, this kit is not an add-glue-and-shake-kit. Adding the dipole antennas was also not so easy. Over night I leaned my Do front upside against the wall. It looked like a big black bug ....





.... painting this bird was quite easy as I used just Black 302 from Revell for it. The interior was mainly painted with Light Olive 45 from Revell, which comes close to RLM 02. That was all. Final coating was made again with Marabu Matt Varnish. The decals are taken from the kit and they are of bad quality. They are stiff and brittle when in warm water. So one of the red lines on the wings broke to several pieces but more important I had to do some emergency rescue to one of the NJG 2 coat of arms because it also broke into several pieces. I don't know what was the intension of Revell to use this decal brand and I will write them an email and tell them about my "experiences". The decals are not from Cartograph, they are made by a company in Portugal. Maybe they are 1 €uro cheaper, who knows. I would recommend, if you want to build this aircraft, look for some better aftermarket decals. I can also recommend to use the Eduard mask EX 485 for the canopy, as it makes work easier. Now that everything is done after a lot of work (and some loud and clear words ....) I must admit that I'm really satisfied with my work and in the end my Do 215 has turned out to a "Black Beauty". And it has already been on 2 expos where I've got a positive feedback ....



.... finally my other "Black Beauty" was curious to see the new arrival. So this is kind of family photo. It's my favourite P-61 "The Spook" with one of the most striking nose arts I know. You can see it also in my avatar. It's that old Monogram kit from 1974, which I've built about 10 years ago. Some time before I joined Aeroscale.
So, again I say "Vielen Dank" for walking around with me and hope, you have enjoyed the trip.

Happy modelling!
Torsten
BlackWidow
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Posted: Monday, March 20, 2017 - 01:52 AM UTC
Gary, no problem at all!

Phil, thanks for your kind words. I'm glad you enjoy looking at my models (me too .... ) My current model will be more modern than the Peshka and will have "Tre Kronor" as national insignia. So you should visit my jet collection then. Will be finished in April.

Torsten
phumbles
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Australia
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Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 02:24 PM UTC
Hi Torsten , always a pleasure to see your latest model.cheers Phil.
GazzaS
#424
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Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 01:08 PM UTC
Torsten,
My apologies!
BlackWidow
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Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 03:47 PM UTC
Thanks for your comment, Gary. Glad you like it, but I won't give Stefan any credit on this build because it's all mine ....

Stefan, thanks for your feedback, too. Yes, I'm really proud how the Peshka came out finally after long weeks just working on the (now more or less invisible) interior. Of course, Irina will fly to the Stetten Expo next weekend as most of the other stuff I've built since last summer. Including some military vehicles with the Iron Cross on it. So if you hear some roaring, that are just my Leos ....

Torsten
GazzaS
#424
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Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 03:42 AM UTC
Stefan,
Great finish! A great, clean build.

Gaz
BigZimmo
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Baden-Württemberg, Germany
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Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 05:58 PM UTC
Another cracker from your assembly line, Torsten. The Pe-2 is really great......well done, mate!!
Looking forward to see you and your new "worbench products" in Stetten next weekend.

Horrido......
Zimmo
BlackWidow
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Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 - 01:44 AM UTC
Magnus, Terri, thanks for your feedback! Glad you like my "Red Star" twin engine

Magnus, you're right. The Luftwaffe tested a captured Pe-2 in Rechlin and found out that it was equal to the Ju 88 (to which is was comparable in use) and in some points even superior. This Pe-2 later found its way into the inventory of the Suomen Ilmavoimat ....
Oh, and you have also got something in your mailbox ....

Torsten
thegirl
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Alberta, Canada
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Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 - 03:55 AM UTC
Well done



Terri
magnusf
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Stockholm, Sweden
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Posted: Saturday, March 11, 2017 - 10:49 PM UTC
Torsten! That's a beautiful aircraft and being flown almost pre-war, it certainly looks ahead of it's time!

Check you in-box for colour suggestions for a more modern subject!



Magnus
BlackWidow
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Posted: Saturday, March 11, 2017 - 09:59 PM UTC
Last weekend I have finished my - so far - only 2017 campaign and today I had time to take photos of my "Soviet Phoenix". Here is the latest addition to my aviation museum, the Petlyakov Pe-2 from Zvezda in 1/48 ....





.... the Pe-2 was the most numerous soviet twin-engined bomber of WW2. Vladimir Petlyakov designed it as a high altitude fighter under the designation VI-100 when he was imprisoned from 1937 on. The first prototype flew in December 1939. Just as mass production was ready to begin, the VVS ordered a re-design of the aircraft to a tactical bomber. Within 45 days Petlyakov redesigned the aircraft and the result was so good that Stalin ordered to set Petlyakov free again. From that time the aircraft was called Pe-2. Though the flying characteristics were great once the Pe-2 was in the air, the aircraft demanded high flying skills of the pilot during take off and especially during landing because of the high landing speed. The bomber could also not fly on one engine without loosing altitude. Nevertheless more than 10.500 (some sources say 11.500) Pe-2 had been built when production ended in August 1945. The "Peshka", as it was called by its crews, was used as a medium bomber, dive bomer, for ground attack and reconnaissance. It equipped more than 80 bomber regiments. The aircraft with a crew of 3 had a maximum speed of 580 km/h, a range of about 1200 kilometers and a service ceiling of 8800 meters. It was powered by 2 liquid cooled Klimov M-105 engines with 1210 hp each. The armament consited of 2 in the nose fixed ShKAS machine guns and 3 rearward firing machine guns caliber 7,62 mm. It could carry up to 1600 kg of bombs. During the war Finland used 7 captured Pe-2. Post war users were Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Yugoslavia. There are a few "Peshkas" left in museums around Europe ....





... I have built "White 24" of the 125. GvBAP (Gvardveyskiy Bombardirovochniy Aviapolk = Guards Bomber Air Regiment) at the Balbasovo air field, summer 1944. The CO was Major Valentin Markov. All posts of his subordinates and air crews were women. One of these aviators was Leitenant (Lieutenant) Irina Osadze (center), here with her navigator Lyudmila Popova (left) and radio operator Taisiya Panferova. She took part in the Operation "Bagration". Although the "Peshka" was not easy to fly, she was known as a courageously and good pilot. She was shot down and had to crash land her aircraft a few times but could always avoid captivity. During one crash she was wounded in the face by broken canopy glass. Luck stayed with her and she survived the war. After the war she left the VVS but stayed with her passion and flew civil aircraft for a few more years. My picture source is Ospey Publishing ....





.... this kit took me quite some time (7 weeks) to build. It's very detailed and consists of 435 parts. 50 parts alone for the left engine, which I have also build but not installed because I like the look of the Pe-2 better this way. And it was easier to paint The over all fitting is very good, Zvezda did a great job here. I had only some problems on the underside behind the bomb bay where I had to use some filler. Also the fitting of the big underside window is not perfect, but that might be more my mistake than Zvezda's fault. Everything else goes together easily. The constuction of this kit is well thought out, so sturdy braces hold the wings perfectly so there is no sanding or filler necessary. Painting this bird took me a few days but it was not difficult. For the underside I have used Russian Light Blue R31 from Agama, the upside camouflage is sprayed free hand as usual and I used Russian Green 71281, Russian Tan 71283 and Dark Grey 71054 (all Vallejo paints) for it. The interior was painted with Grey 374 (cockpit and fuselage) and Dark Grey 378 (wheel wells) from Revell. The use of Eduard's mask EX488 is recommended because of all the small clear parts, especially the fuselage turret ....





.... Zvezda offers 3 different decal versions for this kit of the 12., 40. and 34. GvBAP, but after reading the story of the 125. I knew what I wanted to build. There are not many decals on the sheet, I have used only 10 on this bird. The white stripes (identification for Operation "Bagration") were easily painted, the only decal which didn't come from the sheet is the "White 24" which was sponsored by a left over of my Il-2 Sturmovik. This kit is really nice to build, it just takes a bit more time because of the big amount of parts. Though many of them vanish in the fuselage and are never seen again. I can recommend this kit without any doubt. Over here I paid only 29 Euros at my LHS for it.
So I say "спасибо" for walking around this beautiful aircraft with me and hope you have enjoyed it.

Happy modelling!
Torsten
BlackWidow
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Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 09:24 PM UTC

Quoted Text

.... Don't know how you managed to live without the internet for 2 weeks.
Joel


That is so easy, Joel, you won't believe it. I have 2 great hobbies, were you don't really need the internet - building model kits and travelling. My Transportpanzer (APC) "Fuchs" made a big step towards the finish line in the last 2 weeks .... And for the days around New Years Eve I'll be in the swedish capital where I don't need the www again for some time.

Stefan, thanks for your nice comment. Glad you like my latest build.

Gary, also thanks for your feedback. You're right, it's not easy to find informations about japanese pilots, especially when their names are not Sakai, Iwamoto or Kashiide - just to name some well known pilots. All my informations in case of Itagaki I've got from my Osprey books. The internet has only very little information if any. Recently I had the chance to have a glimpse into a japanese language book about all the Bukosho recipents. Though I couldn't read it at all, their names were also written in Latin letters and I found this photo of Masao Itagaki without oxygen mask ....

GazzaS
#424
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Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 02:46 PM UTC
Hi Torsten!
I don't know how your excellent Ki-61 got past me. Thank you for telling us about the pilot. So little is known about Japanese pilots that I feel glad every time I learn about one.

Thank you for the history, and thank you for sharing your excellent build with us.

Gaz
BigZimmo
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Baden-Württemberg, Germany
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Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 01:10 PM UTC
Hi Torsten!!

Superb Ki and an interesting background story.....another Cracker from your workbench, mate!!

Cheers....
Stefan
Joel_W
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Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 04:58 AM UTC
Torsten,
Glad to hear that you sill alive and modeling. Don't know how you managed to live without the internet for 2 weeks.
Joel
BlackWidow
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Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 12:34 AM UTC
Don't worry guys, I'm still alive. I just had a complete breakdown of my internet and telephone for 2 weeks, because my provider had major problems to activate my new faster connections. So no internet and no telephone, only mobile ....

Damian, the Spitfire is the wrong aircraft. The design of the Ki-61 is copied a lot from the Heinkel He 100. In fact, the Doolittle Raiders first thought they were attacked by a Me 109 or an italian C 202 "Folgore". All 3 aircraft were powered by the same engine, built by Daimler Benz, Kawasaki and Alfa Romeo. That's why they are also sometimes called "sisters by heart".

And thanks to both of you for your compliments about the story I wrote down. Glad you like it. This young fellow surely had an extraordinary wartime career.

Happy modelling!
Torsten
Joel_W
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Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 09:49 PM UTC
Torsten,
Another beautifully built addition to your growing miniature museum. Your painting is as usual up to your usual high standards as every single demarcation line is razor sharp without a singe issue.

You certainly have brought this oldish 1990 Hasegawa model up to current standards. Well done. And thanks for the mini history lesson that I always find so fascinating.

Joel
AussieReg
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
#007
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Victoria, Australia
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Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 01:49 AM UTC
Yet another fascinating back-story and a beautiful build. Such an elegant aircraft. When I look at the nose of this in the close-up image it actually looks like the designer has taken a drawing of a spitfire and turned it upside down. The underside of the nose is quite flat and the top curves down sharply to the spinner, and the stacks are at the bottom.

Cheers, D
BlackWidow
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Posted: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 01:19 AM UTC
While Gary goes new ways in modelling his superb quarterscale B-29, I have build an aircraft which the Superfortresses encountered quite often in the last year of WW2. Today I want to show you my new Kawasaki Ki-61 "Hien" from Hasegawa in 1/48 ....


.... the Ki-61 was developed by Kawasaki's famous designer Takeo Doi, who was also responsable for the Ki-45 "Toryu". It was the only mass produced Japanese fighter using a liquid cooled inline engine. It was introduced to the IJAAF in 1942 and first shots in anger were fired in April 1942 when 2 prototypes attacked the B-25's of the Doolittle Raid over Tokyo. But they were ineffective as they had only training ammo aboard. First unit to be equipped with the "Hien" was the 68. Sentai, which had tough fights over New Guinea against the allied air forces. The Ki-61 was powered by a Kawasaki Ha-40 engine with 1175 hp, which was a licensed build german Daimler Benz DB 601 A. But it never was as reliable as the german original, especially the cooling system was prone. Nevertheless about 2600 Ki-61 were produced. It had a maximum speed of nearly 600 km/h at 5000 meters and a service ceiling of 12000 meters. The climb rate was 714 meters per minute or 7 minutes for 5000 meters. The range was 600 km without and 1800 km with external tanks. The usual armament were four 12,7 mm machine guns (2 in the wings and 2 in the fuselage) but that depended on the version and the use of operation. Today there are still 3 fuselages left in museums around the world in more or less good/bad conditions ....





.... I have build aircraft "14" of the very famous 244. Sentai, based at Chofu Airfield in February 1945 during the defense of the japanese mainland. It was flown by the remarkable Gunso (Sergeant) Masao Itagaki, who belonged to the Shinten Sekutai, an air-to-air ramming unit within the 244. Sentai. Itagaki was one of the rare double-Bukosho recipents. The Bukosho was the highest military medal of Japan during WW2, comparable with the Victoria Cross or the Medal Of Honor. On the 3. December 1944 Itagaki rammed the B-29 "Long Distance T-49" of the 498th BG and bailed out of his damaged fighter without a scratch. He won his first Bukosho for this attack. On the 27. January 1945 he rammed another B-29 and escaped again by parachute unhurt to get his second Bukosho for this action. From March to May 1945 he flew Kamikaze escort missions to Okinawa. Luck stayed at his side and he survived the war as one of only 2 known double Bukosho recipents. At the end of the war Itagaki was only 19 years old .... Unfortunatly his post-war life is unknown to me. I found this amazing shot of him sitting in his "14" ready to take off in Osprey's "Ki-61 Aces" ....


.... Hasegawa came out with this limited edition in 2010 and after recently reading the story of the pilot I knew instantly which version of the 3 choices I want to build. The kit is from the 1990's and has some issues. So there is some filler needed on both wing roots, furthermore a lot of sanding has to be done. I read that pilots often removed the wing guns to be lighter and more manouvrable in the heights of the B-29's. Some even had only one machine gun in the fuselage. I have looked at the 2 photos I have of "14" and decided to close the gun openings in the wings with putty. Not sure if this is correct but it might have been so. After painting this area I was not satisfied with how it looked and decided to cover the openings "Spitfire-like" with a piece of Tamiya Tape painted yellow. Maybe the groundcrews in those days have also used Tamiya Tape The paints on this bird all come from Revell. I recently read that the late war brownish-green of the japanese fighters would come close to RAL 6014 Gelboliv. Which is a bit funny as that's the paint on German Bundeswehr vehicles until the late 1970's. So I have used Yellow Olive 42, White 301, Black 302 and Red 36 for the upper side, Silver 90 for the underside, Yellow 310 for the leading edges of the wings, Red-Brown 83 for the propeller and Brown 87 for the interior. Final coating was again made with Clear Flat Varnish from Marabu.This bird gave me quite a tough masking job, especially those curves on the red tail were difficult. Parafilm didn't work well enough here, so I used small pieces of Kip Tape which surprisingly did a good job here. Masking the canopy was done with Eduard EX055. All decals are taken from the kit. The japanese character on the rudder means "I" and stands here of course for Itagaki. As ususal this model is build oob and not weathered ....



.... again I say "domo arigato" for watching and hope you've enjoyed this little walk around with me. There are only very few videos on Youtube about the Ki-61, but I found a short war time japanese propaganda film of the 244. Sentai you might like to see.

Happy modelling!
Torsten
BlackWidow
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Posted: Wednesday, November 02, 2016 - 07:52 PM UTC
Thanks Joel and Oliver!

If I had to pick a favourite T'bolt I would go for the Razorback. At least it's the real P-47, isn't it? And as I said before, there are more to come to my collection, but none planned in the near future. But I'm already working on the next kits.

Torsten
Antilles
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Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
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Posted: Monday, October 31, 2016 - 02:58 PM UTC
Torsten,
this is really a lucky bunch of jugs. Nicely done and presented. My favourite is the M-version. You very much for sharing!

Oliver
Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, October 30, 2016 - 11:26 PM UTC
Torsten,
I for one am looking forward to your new completed builds as they're shown at the end of your assembly line.
Joel
BlackWidow
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Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 04:08 PM UTC
Thanks Simon!

As I said, I still have a few P-47 kits in my stash (mainly Tamiya), but none planned to be build in 2017. But don't worry, I won't get bored. I have sooo many other kits planned for next year. Probably more than I can build ....

Torsten
simonn
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Australia
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Posted: Friday, October 28, 2016 - 04:03 PM UTC
An envious collection of jugs. Torsten. Thanks for sharing.

Simon
BlackWidow
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Posted: Friday, October 28, 2016 - 03:23 PM UTC
Thanks Joel!
It was also a pleasure for me to join this campaign (I planned a Thunderbolt this year anyway) and to show you all how I build my model kits.

When I looked at all the nose arts of the P-47 I've build so far, I thought it would be a nice idea to show them here a bit closer. Hope you enjoy it ....

P-47 D "Ole Cock" (Tamiya)


P-47 M "Miss June" (Tamiya), left cowling side


P-47 M "Miss June" (Tamiya), right cowling side


P-47 D "Hawkeye" (Tamiya)


P-47 N "Expected Goose" (Academy)



P-47 D "Rabbit" (Academy), left cowling side


P-47 D "Rabbit" (Academy), right cowling side


Happy modelling!
Torsten