login   |    register
Start Here (for Beginners)
This forum is for younger modelers or people just starting out in the hobby.
Hosted by Kevin Brant
Primer... What about it?
Gendrok
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Nicaragua
Joined: July 21, 2010
KitMaker: 125 posts
AeroScale: 45 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 04:59 AM UTC
As a kid I built plenty of model, build not paint. So know that I'm back into it I'm inexperienced when it comes to paint. After my first experience with a Revell Germany Sea Venom, it wdidn't come out to bad, I'm looking to improve. I've been studying, and I have tons of questions floating about my head, of them a few are for primers.

Use primer or no? I'm working on getting an airbrush and I've seen a couple of tips were airbrush users say they skip priming, by releasing just air as they go on painting.

I mix paint types (obviously after they dry), so I imagine there's enamel and acylic primer, what primer is best for someone who paints with enamel and acylic?

I live in Nicaragua, and my modelling material has to be obtained outside the country, it's a hassle for many reasons, so I'm wondering if I can find something that will work in a home improvement or handy store? Would any have any chemicals or additives I should avoid?



Thank you in advance
Siderius
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: September 20, 2005
KitMaker: 1,747 posts
AeroScale: 1,673 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 01:12 PM UTC
Hi there, Russell here. I think that the Testors line of acrylic paints, called Model Master Acryl is a very good choice for you. Acrylic paints clean up easily, airbrush easily (at least that has been my experience) and they are "healthier" for you in that they are non-toxic. If you spray in an indoor environment I would recommend getting an organic vapors paint mask just for a bit extra protection.

An airbrush is a wonderful tool for model building. I have been using the Testors made Aztek line of airbrushes for about 14 years now with great success, I think. If you choose to get an airbrush, look seriously at that line, they are easy to use and give pretty good results. Take a look at my gallery which is the photos button on the top of this post and check out the kits I built with the Aztek. It will give you some idea of what kind of results you can get with a little bit of practice.

As to primers, I often do use a dark green or grey primer. It doesn't have to be specifically for priming, it can be just a dark grey color or green as I mentioned. It is useful in that is gives you a look at how the mode looks with paint on it. Also, it allows you to check out any seam work you have done and see how well you have completed that task on your kit.

If you have any questions, just ask, this is a great forum from all over the world for help. Hope this helps you a bit. Take care, Happy modeling. Russell
Gendrok
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Nicaragua
Joined: July 21, 2010
KitMaker: 125 posts
AeroScale: 45 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 01:55 PM UTC
Thanks a lot Russell, what you say about the primer I guess it seems about right. Going back to my first paint job, I recall coming to chance upon small errors. I guess it doesn't really doesn't matter if the thing says primer in the front, it's how I use the paint that matters I guess.

As for the paint brush I think I will be going for an Aztec.

Thank you sir
Siderius
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: September 20, 2005
KitMaker: 1,747 posts
AeroScale: 1,673 posts
Posted: Thursday, December 16, 2010 - 02:02 PM UTC
Glad to help out. I recommend that you get a double action airbrush, one which allows you to control the amount of air and paint that you have coming out of your airbrush. I have an Aztek model 4709 which allows both single and double action use; however, you really only need the double action and it would save you some money as well on your purchase.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BKZRZW/ref=asc_df_B000BKZRZW1352071?smid=A23ADOZFIJNPFB&tag=pgmp-1550-95-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395105&creativeASIN=B000BKZRZW

I have pasted a link to Amazon to show you what one looks like. The nozzles screw in and out of the front of the airbrush. Eventually (the nozzles) wear out and you have to buy a new one at about 11 American dollars a piece. You should get plenty of time on the heads you get with the brush though. I hope this helps out some more. I'm sure you will enjoy your airbrush. You do need a source of air pressure though to drive it. A small air compressor would be a good buy and you can get those almost anywhere. An art supply store would have one for sure. They might even have an Aztek and that might save you from ordering it. Don't know. Take care, Russell