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Pin- or sludgewash?
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Monday, October 11, 2010 - 04:09 AM UTC
I want to give my Henschel 123 a sludgewash, but it has raised panel lines. Is it possible to do so or is it better to give it a pinwash?
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 08:56 PM UTC
Any ideas please?!
NickZour
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Attica, Greece / Ελλάδα
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Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 01:30 AM UTC
In my opinion do a sludgewash first to blend the colors & than do a pinwash to highlight the raised panel lines (& anything else you want )

And some photos of the finished model please


Cheers Nick
AJLaFleche
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: May 05, 2002
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Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 02:40 AM UTC
Sludgewash: promoted by those who benefit from you ruining your paint job, decals and/or whole model and needing to buy replacements.
thegirl
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Alberta, Canada
Joined: January 19, 2008
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Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 02:52 AM UTC
In this case a pin wash would be best . Like Fred has pointed out a sludge wash will only end in frustration .
NickZour
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Attica, Greece / Ελλάδα
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Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 03:21 AM UTC
Where is the EDIT

... colors & than do a pinwash ... than=then


Quoted Text

a sludge wash will only end in frustration .



Except if you have applied one or two coats of varnish


Cheers Nick
stonar
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England - West Midlands, United Kingdom
Joined: August 15, 2008
KitMaker: 337 posts
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Posted: Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 03:23 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Sludgewash: promoted by those who benefit from you ruining your paint job, decals and/or whole model and needing to buy replacements.



Not if you seal and protect your paint /decals before applying the wash. Apply the wash over a nice glossy coat of Klear/Future or similar and you'll have no trouble removing the excess.
I'm guessing from your post that you didn't do this and couldn't get the stuff off!
Steve
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Sunday, October 17, 2010 - 09:23 PM UTC
Hmmm, nice discussion. I'm not sure what to do yet. It's my first model since 25 years and been working on it for the past 5 months so i don't want to screw it up.
It's for my diorama.

Tx for the input. I'll show the pics when its done
Red4
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California, United States
Joined: April 01, 2002
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Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2010 - 04:28 AM UTC
Since your kit has raised panel lines I wouldn't use either method....but that is just me. Instead I would suggest you post-shade the panel lines using an airbrush...provided you have one. This is my preferred method of shading raised panel lines and in some instances recessed ones. Just need to make sure your mixture is extremely thin and apply it in light coats, building it up to the level you are happy with. If by chance you don't have an airbrush, you can achieve the same results using pastels. Hope this helps. Just my .0185 cents worth. "Q"
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2010 - 05:09 AM UTC
What about drybrushing them? I have no airbrush and no experience with pastels.
Red4
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California, United States
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Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 - 07:46 AM UTC
Johan, Pastels are easy to work with. The are basically a chalk like material that can be used to darken or highlight areas. For your HS-123 I would suggest using a dark brown color for the panel lines. Simply scrape off some of the pastel material onto a piece of paper with the back edge of a modeling knife, or use some sand paper. You should have a nice little pile of dark brown dust when you are done. Then, using a semi stiff brush, gather some of the pastel powder on the bristles. Work this powder along the panel line doing a small area at a time. I would do this after the model has been placed on its base to avoid a lot of handling. You could do the bottom of the plane first, then mount it to the base, then continue with the upper surfaces. There are different types of pastels. The ones you DON"T WANT are oil based. You can tell they are oil based as they feel oily when you touch them The ones you do want, are dry to the touch. A starter set should last you a long time. I still have the same set I bought some 35 years ago as a kid. Practice on an old kit to get the hang of it. If you get a little too much powder down, simply wipe it down with a damp paper towel or cloth and you can start over. If you want to seal them, you will have to apply them heavier as the sealer usually causes them to fade. If and when I use them, they are the last thing to go on and I don't seal them. Hope this helps. "Q"
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 - 10:05 AM UTC
Tx for the How Too Q. Do u apply it on a flat or a gloss undercoat?
Red4
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California, United States
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Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010 - 11:50 AM UTC
Flat coat works best. They tend to smear when applied over gloss coats. Good luck and post some pics of your efforts. "Q"
Watimena
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South Australia, Australia
Joined: May 09, 2010
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Posted: Saturday, October 23, 2010 - 03:16 PM UTC
Any tips on doing a pin wash? I've done the sludge wash before and that works ok, adds a bit of depth and blends the colors a bit. It also fills in the panel lines. I usually use the technique described here:

http://essmc.org.au/weathering.html

I'll use a black, grey or brown was depending on the subject.

I saw a pin wash on a kit in the Big Beautiful bombers campaign, Jesper's Ju-86 I believe, and I was wondering what the technique is. What kind of paints do you use, how do you prepare the surface ie - before, after decals etc, on gloss coat, matt coat etc. I have seen an article using it on an armoured vehicle, but it was to make it look really filthy, and I was after something more subtle.

Any tips or links welcome.
Mohawk73
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Friesland, Netherlands
Joined: December 13, 2009
KitMaker: 388 posts
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Posted: Monday, October 25, 2010 - 01:28 AM UTC
Perhaps this will come in handy:
http://www.migproductions.com/minisite/lavados/washes.htm

I'm not sure to use the pastel technique. Maybe i will only give the lower parts a dark wash because i dont want to ruin my plane through may lack of experience.

When it's done i will show the pictures. I hope in a week or 2.