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general paint questions.
Killerbe83
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: February 25, 2009
KitMaker: 21 posts
AeroScale: 20 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 07:29 AM UTC
I have read some of the other topics regarding paint. However not all answer my questions since they are pretty broad questions. Since I just got into modeling I don't know much of anything about the different types of paint out there. I used Testors enamel for my first model, both jar and spray. Worked well.

1. Besides one being water soluble and the other not. What is the difference between Acrylic and Enamel. Pro and Cons?

2. If a certain model calls out for a certain type can you use the other without ill effect?

3. Is one Paint manufacture better then others? Is there a brand superior above all others.

4. Can both types be used on the same model? Or should one be used throughout the entire build.

I have purchased a Tamiya 1/48 P-51D Mustang. Do I have to use Tamyia acrylic paints, since i have some Testors colors already that will also work for this model?

Any information will be a great deal of help!

Kyle
Siderius
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: September 20, 2005
KitMaker: 1,747 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 03:00 PM UTC
Hi there Killer Bee! What a name, wow! Ha ha. As to your questions maybe I can help you a little bit.

Acrylic paints great virtues are that they can be thinned with water, clean up with water, and are "healthier" to be around. I recommend an organic vapors paint mask though, even though I don't always wear mine. Do as I say not as I do you know. I think they are every bit as good as enamels. The colors are as rich, as true and they dry very quickly to a hardness which is as good as an enamel paint.

I wouldn't worry about using two different kinds of acrylic paints either. I use Model Master Acryl and Polly Scale Acrylics on the same model sometimes. I don't think there should be a problem spraying say RLM 74 in Polly Scale, then RLM 75 in Acryl over it, although I do tend to, for obsessive-compulsive reasons mainly, ha ha, use just one line or the other if I can.

I would go with acrylic paints if you are airbrushing because they are so easy to thin and use. Also, some colors spray just fine, such as yellow, unthinned. In fact I recommend you do that. Just make sure you spray a nice tan or RLM 79 color first as a base before putting yellow over it. That works every time for me!

For your Mustang I would try either Polly Scale acrylic railroad color aluminum, or the Model Master Acryl aluminum. Once you start with acrylics it is my opinion you never look back. Hope this info helps some Kyle. Take care and happy modeling. Russell
Killerbe83
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: February 25, 2009
KitMaker: 21 posts
AeroScale: 20 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 12:51 AM UTC
Thanks for the information Russell!

Since I have just started modeling airbrushing is not in the picture yet. I figured I should learn the basics and work my way up. In addition, I don't have a well ventilated area/paint boot since I'm currently still a renter. I might be posting in the near future about airbrushes.

One of my questions I think you misunderstood, when I asked about using multiple brands on one build. I was asking is it OK to use Acrylic & Enamel on the same model. This would allow me to use the enamels I purchased for my first model that is also used on my Tamiya P-51, and buy new acrylics for the colors I still need to complete the kit.

Last does a chart exist that lists all of the colors from all of the paint companies. A chart that says this color from brand X matches this color from brand Y which is also matches this color from Brand Z.

Thanks again,

Kyle
Siderius
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: September 20, 2005
KitMaker: 1,747 posts
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Posted: Friday, February 27, 2009 - 05:27 PM UTC
Hi Kyle. A short answer is no. I would not mix acrylic and oil based paints. Use one or the other. Hope this helps. Russell.
amegan
#243
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England - North East, United Kingdom
Joined: March 21, 2008
KitMaker: 968 posts
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Posted: Monday, March 02, 2009 - 11:51 AM UTC
Do not ever use Enamel over Acrylic, they react, I have used acrylic over enamel. I would not recommend mixing the two on a single model. Brushing matt (flat) paints of either type is easy and both cover well although white and yellow are always trouble. I would avoid a polished metal aircraft unless you airbrush, then read Lampie's article before you attempt it although silver doped fabric works fine. Here in the UK I use Tamiya acrylics and have recently tried Vallejo paints. Acrylics clean out of the brush easily using water and don't clog brushes. My main criticism of Tamiya paint is the limited colours available. Vallejo paints semed OK but are fairly expensive here and not worth the extra.
I used to use Humbrol enamels a lot but you need to use white spirit to thin and clean implements with. I don't put enamels through the airbrush but still brush finish small parts. I have not yet found a gloss acrylic that gives a good finish where I could get a decent gloss finish using enamels. Acrylics are touch dry in minutes, matt enamels in about 20 mins, gloss enamels take hours to dry. Colour charts are available on the net from the manufacturers web sites, I have a Tamiya, Humbrol, Testors and Vallejo charts I think. Lastly, if you do airbrush, acrylics smell far better than enamels, better for domestic harmony. Finally, I never used to use Finish (Klear) as a protective gloss coat over matt paints but it really works and helps with decal application. Keep reading the site, advice is good and freely given, you may not use it today, but it will come in handy sometime. Enjoy the Mustang

Andrew
Killerbe83
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: February 25, 2009
KitMaker: 21 posts
AeroScale: 20 posts
Posted: Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 06:32 AM UTC
I'm going to use Tamiya paints for my Mustang build. Just need to get them in the mail. Should be coming tomorrow.

Can anyone give me any tips or trick to get a good smooth coatings. I'll be using brush for the internal details and spray cans for the base and body coats. Do i need to thin down the Tamiya paints before brushing them on. is this necessary.

Any tips or information will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Kyle
Uruk-Hai
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Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: January 31, 2003
KitMaker: 795 posts
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Posted: Thursday, March 12, 2009 - 06:45 AM UTC
I have had no problem what so ever putting Acrylic over Enamel or vice versa.
As long as the layer beneath is dry I would be suprised to see problems occur.

What I like with Humbrols is the possibility to blend them a minute or two when shading and highlighting.

Cheers
Tin_Bitz
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United Kingdom
Joined: June 26, 2008
KitMaker: 35 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 04:02 AM UTC
Hey

When you say that they react (enamels on acrylics) how do they react? I’m asking s have just scrapped my Tamiya Mosquito because the paint job went so badly wrong. I used Tamiya acrylics on Humbrol enamels…..

Any ideas?
hkopper
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 01, 2008
KitMaker: 529 posts
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Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 10:16 AM UTC
I've not experienced problems with using acrylics over enamels (not sure vice-versa). I usually prime my builds with an enamel primer (rattle can) and spray the disired color with acrylics. The primer does seem to enable the acrylic paint adhere much better to the kit.

In terms of acrylics, I use tamiya, vallejo and ModelMaster colors. The main issue with vallejo is that it tends to clog my iwata spray gun much more then the other brands so you might need the thin it a bit more. This can be corrected by using their "Air" brand of paint. It's a bit more pricey so I tend to use Tamiya and ModelMaster more for sraying and vallejo more for brush painting (not to mention that vallejo paint is not as readily avail as the other brands).
Phil_H
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New South Wales, Australia
Joined: November 10, 2005
KitMaker: 546 posts
AeroScale: 23 posts
Posted: Friday, March 27, 2009 - 01:19 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I'm going to use Tamiya paints for my Mustang build. Just need to get them in the mail. Should be coming tomorrow.

Can anyone give me any tips or trick to get a good smooth coatings. I'll be using brush for the internal details and spray cans for the base and body coats. Do i need to thin down the Tamiya paints before brushing them on. is this necessary.

Any tips or information will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Kyle



Hi Kyle,

Some people will tell you not to brush paint with Tamiya acrylics. This is because they can be somewhat tricky to achieve smooth coats with when brush painting.

For best results with Tamiya acrylics:
- Don't paint straight from the bottle
- Decant a small amount of paint onto a palett, Add a little Tamiya thinner (say about 10%) to your paint. (Tamiya thinner is said to contain a retarding agent which slows the drying of the paint and allows it more time to self-level. There is already a small amount in the paint, but it's not really enough.
- pour a small amount of clean thinner into another well on your palette
- before dipping your brush in the paint, dip the tip into the clean thinner and moisten the bristles. (Important: You are aiming for moist, not wet)
- Dip your brush in the thinned paint, but don't overload your brush
- paint in smooth, even strokes in the same direction, and avoid painting over previously covered areas - paint from a "wet edge" (ie. the end of your last covered area) Tamiya paint uses alcohol as the primary reducer and it has a tendency to skin over very quickly. It may appear to be dry, but that's only the surface appearance, and it is still "wet" underneath. If you paint ove these areas it will pull up the partially dry paint in big ugly lumps.
- If recoating is required, allow it to dry at least overnight before recoating (repeat the steps above)
- while painting, if the paint starts to dry and accumulate on your brush, stop and clean your brush before continuing. A build up of paint on your brush impedes the flow of the paint and xan cause streaks and lumps.

Use good quality (sable or better) brushes. They are more expensive to start with, but with proper care will give you better performance and last longer than cheap discount store brushes.

Ok... This may sound daunting, especially if you're just starting out, but ionce you get into a routine it's really no big deal. In fact, the very same process can be applied to other manufacturers' paints (eg. Vallejo Model Color, which are very thick straight out of the bottle) .
Killerbe83
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: February 25, 2009
KitMaker: 21 posts
AeroScale: 20 posts
Posted: Friday, March 27, 2009 - 06:55 AM UTC
Thanks Phil for the helpful hints.

I didn't by the thinner and read that water should be enough thin down the paint. It seams to be working pretty good. I waited long enough for the pints to come in i didn't want to wait any longer to get the thinner.

please check out the progress pictures of this build. let me know if you have any additional advice or constructive criticism.

http://picasaweb.google.com/bernard.kyle/LouIVTamiya#

Thank you again