login   |    register
Start Here (for Beginners)
This forum is for younger modelers or people just starting out in the hobby.
Hosted by Kevin Brant
Reading the Seams
gcn123
Joined: September 13, 2007
KitMaker: 69 posts
AeroScale: 60 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 09:28 PM UTC
Definitely keep it going, very interesting and its an area I really struggle with
Red4
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: April 01, 2002
KitMaker: 4,285 posts
AeroScale: 1,164 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 06:41 PM UTC
I'll add my two cents worth here. A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, I learned that if there is a signifcant gap, don't try to close it with pressure and a butt load of glue. It distorts things and you end up having a seam anyways. Instead, fill the gap with scrap plastic until it is closed, apply your glue, look for the plastic "ooze" spoke of in the first segment, and then drive on. So far the thread is great. Much appreciated Gerry. Keep it going. "Q"
HawkeyeV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 05:14 PM UTC
Filling with styrene whether it is stretch sprue of extruded stock is stronger and easier to work than CA.







More later, I noticed my grammar errors in my picture captions...a long day at the office followed by too long at the bench, then at the computer.
HawkeyeV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 05:08 PM UTC
Some seams are obvious that they need repair before proceeding on with the build.



Some seams will lurk wait to pop into sight after the paint goes on. Hence the title, reading the seams. Little clues can be spotted before the paint hits the plastic.





This little area of this seam shows the tattle tail sign of dust inside the flaw. Had I wiped down the model before inspecting this might have evaded me and not rear its evil head until paint was applied. Fortunately I learn how to read the seam!

Red4
_VISITCOMMUNITY
California, United States
Joined: April 01, 2002
KitMaker: 4,285 posts
AeroScale: 1,164 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 02:56 PM UTC
Keep it going Gerry. There are a lot of folks who should be watching this. I've been building for over 30 years and still learn new stuff everyday. Keep the thread alive! "Q"
HawkeyeV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 02:23 PM UTC
The whole point is to develop your skills so your models are better.
butchm
Joined: September 06, 2007
KitMaker: 7 posts
AeroScale: 6 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 02:17 PM UTC
Hi Gerald,

Awesome, lets have more!

PS, I don't think I'll ever get a job with manufacturer doing 'bare' plastic display kits. It must be a near impossible task if you have to do one with fit issues!

Cheers,
Butch
HawkeyeV
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2008 - 11:15 AM UTC
For many of you you're wanting to have a seamless build. Well, it took me many years to learn just how to accomplish that feat but I think I can help you along. On my website I published an article about Perfect Seams, I've been working on getting part two of that article ready so I decided to share some of its contents with you.

I use liquid solvents applied with a Touch n Flow. My two choices of solvents are Weld-On#3 and Tenax. The Tenax being the cooler of the two. One you have test fitted your parts to make sure they match up as best as you could ever hope for you simply hold the parts together and apply the solvent along the seam. This does take some practice. If you can apply it from the inside, say through the wing opening, cockpit or any other means that gives you access so the TnF can reach inside and deposit the solvent along the seam the better. Otherwise outside is okay too.

Once you get the solvent into the seam pitch the parts together and hold them until it begins to set up. You should have a line of bubbled plastic oozing slightly from the seam.


Once the seam has cured it is time to start to remove the weld bead from the seam. (Just like they do with steel.) Using a polishing stick, sanding stick or sand paper you want to take the bead down flush with the surrounding surface.



If you can see the seam while sanding like in the photo above, it tells you that the weld didn't penetrate evenly or completely. The line forms from the dust from the sanding. This needs to be filled. If the seam is deep...we'll talk about that later. But for seams as shown, one can use some Mr Surfacer or thinned putty.



When I apply the Mr Surfacer I use a brush. I blot it on, don't wipe it on like paint, you'll not fill the seams flaws and only make yourself more work sanding and polishing.



To really test your skills, build a model without using any fillers or paints. This will help you refine your skills as a builder. Ever notice those models the manufacturer display in plain plastic?



Would you like me to continue with this thread?