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Reading the Seams
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
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Posted: Monday, March 17, 2008 - 02:06 AM UTC
Yes, the green is a filler type putty whereas the blue is a glazing...thinner and smoother in consistency. If it is the Super Red you should be okay..,see descriptions below.

Blue: Slow drying, easy spreading putty. Provides more working time than 3M Acryl-Green Spot Putty, part number 05960. Recommended for filling minor low areas and deeper sand scratches. Loads paper less and can be sanded in 30 minutes.

Green: Fast drying, easy sanding putty designed for spotty repairs. Spreads very easily. Loads paper less and can be sanded in 10 to 15 minutes.

Red: Good general purpose putty. Fills small pinholes and scratches. Spreads and sands easily, dries fast, has minimum shrinkage and excellent adhesion. It loads paper less and feathers out to a smooth surface.

SUPER Red: 3M Super Red Putty is an excellent glazing putty, easy to spread and self-leveling. A nitrocellulose putty with long working time and minimal shrinkage. Feathers out to a smooth surface. Sands easily even after overnight drying.

Visit the 3M website for more information.

jaypee
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: February 07, 2008
KitMaker: 1,699 posts
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Posted: Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 10:58 AM UTC
Thank you so much for this thread. It has improved my modelling no end. And informed me as to how cement is supposed to work. This should be made into an article if possilbe.
Grifter
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: November 17, 2002
KitMaker: 608 posts
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Posted: Friday, April 04, 2008 - 12:22 AM UTC
I think this would be a good topic for a permanant sticky.
CrewChief16
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Khania, Greece / Ελλάδα
Joined: July 09, 2008
KitMaker: 28 posts
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Posted: Saturday, July 26, 2008 - 01:59 AM UTC
Very good.....you helped a lot...thanx very much
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
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Posted: Friday, November 28, 2008 - 04:23 AM UTC
I've gotten some recent questions about my method/technique, here are a couple of illustrations that might help.

Applying solvent with a Touch N Flow is like using a welding rod to bond two pieces of metal together.



amegan
#243
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England - North East, United Kingdom
Joined: March 21, 2008
KitMaker: 968 posts
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Posted: Saturday, November 29, 2008 - 10:34 PM UTC
Discovered this thread today and I agree it should be required reading for all modellers. Although I have used solvents (Plastic Weld is my favourite) I hadn't seen the touch and flo. I am currently working on an Airfix Beagle Bassett that has the worst seams I've seen for a long time as well as raised detail. This has given me a lot to think about. Thanks.
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
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Posted: Sunday, November 30, 2008 - 01:53 AM UTC
I've gotten a few emails recently asking for more information and clarification as to how/why I use solvents to get such clean seams in my builds. For some there still is some confusion about the difference between "glues" and "solvents" and how they work.

A glue is a substance that bonds two objects together (think of a well chewed piece of gum stuck between two sheets of paper)...it could have solvents such as Toulene in its makeup to soften the surface of the material (plastic) it is being applied to. It uses the solvent to help grab on and hold onto the surface it was applied. "Glue"...a substance between two objects that holds them in close proximity to each other.

Glue remains intact and detectable after it has dried and cured. Over time it will break down and lose its ability to "hold" on the pieces...usually because it begins to crystalize.

Solvents evaporate almost immediately after application, softening the material's surface (plastic), causing the two to melt and meld into one with the application of a little applied pressure forcing the two surfaces together. Since there is no residue and the surfaces are joined into one uniform unit. There is no opportunity for any loss of strength or "bond" because there is no longer a seam separating the two pieces.
SkyTypeS
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United States
Joined: December 13, 2008
KitMaker: 2 posts
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Posted: Saturday, December 13, 2008 - 06:01 AM UTC
Gerald,

I'm no beginner, but your techniques are a definite big addition to my arsenal! I've been building for more than 30 years, so I've picked up a couple of these along the way. Your presentation and clear descriptions make it all seem much easier!

I enjoy the squakbox as well. Keep it coming!

Mike Oberholtzer
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Friday, February 13, 2009 - 11:32 AM UTC
Simply wow.

I find this sort of thread totally engrossing. I've been building kits, off and on, for 35 years and had thought I had acquired a decent set of skills, but Hawkeye's tutorial just opened my eyes as to how much work lies ahead to bring my modeling 'game' up to the next level.

Thanks so much (and keep it coming).

Cheers,
Fred
Sammuel
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California, United States
Joined: September 02, 2008
KitMaker: 197 posts
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Posted: Friday, February 20, 2009 - 08:36 AM UTC
Outstanding Info!!! Can you put this into a word doc or PDF and send it to me via PM at this site? Or have it printed up on this site as an article.

Thank you

Sam
warreni
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South Australia, Australia
Joined: August 14, 2007
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Posted: Friday, February 20, 2009 - 09:23 AM UTC
Have been following this thread closely and can only add one thing, Tamiya Extra Thin Liquid Cement does a great job as a solvent. I have even found I can glue main parts together woth ordinary liquid cement, then when the oozed has oozed use the extra thin cement and a brush to remove the ooze and produce a very smooth join.. Just an extra idea!

Continue the great work HawkeyeV!
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 07:59 AM UTC
OK HawkeyeV,


I just bought a tube of the 3M Red glazing putty. Its a positively monstrously large tube. I haven't even popped the cap but I have some projects coming up where I'll need to do some filling. I don't want to screw anything up.

So the dumb question: What is the best way to use/apply this stuff?

Cheers,
Fred
Murdo
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: May 25, 2005
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Posted: Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 09:48 AM UTC
Absolutely excellent!


hkopper
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 01, 2008
KitMaker: 529 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 01:24 PM UTC
Frederick,
Where did you purchase the 3m putty/product. I've been looking for it but to no avail.
Thanks in advance
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 03:17 PM UTC
I purchased it at a locally owned auto parts shop. They happen to carry a lot of 3M products ( I use Fast Tack adhesive to glue on my racing sew ups so I happened to turn to them first for putty)

Try shops that specialize in auto body supplies.

Cheers,
Fred
hkopper
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 01, 2008
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 06:30 AM UTC
Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. Did you try the putty? If so how do you apply it (im used to using the green one from squadron).
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Sunday, March 22, 2009 - 09:55 AM UTC
Not yet.

...but I'm well armed with Mr Surfacer, Tenax, a couple of touch-n-flows, and a box of newly made stretched sprue, lots of sanding sticks a bevy of fresh files (gonna go down to my favorite local hardware store in the morning and get a couple of larger ones to add to the collection.

I'm armed for bear and loving it.

First attempt at reconstruction tonight. I'm going to try the 'stretched sprue technique' to try and restore the cowling hinge on a 1/48 Bf 109.

Cheers,
Fred
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Saturday, March 28, 2009 - 03:12 AM UTC
Wow!!

Got to use Mr. Surfacer 1000 today for the first time and it _rocked my modeling world_! I'm talking like my first Exacto or my first airbrush moment.

It goes on in razor thin coats, dries quickly, leaves a splendid slightly satin sheen, and clearly shows any seam issue or blemish. It then sands marvelously well. I'm hooked.

One question though. I used a spray can Mr. Surfacer on my 109 this morning but I also bought a jar of liquid Mr. Surfacer too. I want to start running it through the airbrush. Is there an optimum paint to thinner ratio? Am I correct that I need to cut it with Lacquer thinner? If no what is the best thinner/cleaner?

Cheers,
Fred
squeeky1968
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: June 06, 2006
KitMaker: 315 posts
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Posted: Saturday, April 04, 2009 - 10:04 AM UTC
Hi Gerald,
I`ve been building models for nigh on thirty years and my kits have varied from little gems to real dogs,but i`ve follwed your advice as i work on a 1967 vintage Revell P-40 warhawk and it`s going great.Your advice about not glueing all the way around wings and fuselages in one go to allow things to line up is paying dividends,as i do`nt want to screw up a oldie but goldie.
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK WITH THE THREAD AS IT`S NEVER TOO LATE TO LEARN.
hkopper
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Florida, United States
Joined: March 01, 2008
KitMaker: 529 posts
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Posted: Friday, April 10, 2009 - 01:07 AM UTC
I'm about to attach the fuselage halves and wanted to make sure that I understand the mentioned process and get the best advice that I can. Do you apply the glue to each of the halves and then attach or do you attach the halves and then glue on top of the seam? If you glue on top of the seams, will using tape on top to secure the bond wreak havok with the tape? Also, which adhesive is better to use for this process? I currently have:
- Testors liquid cement with the fine tip applicator.
- Tamiya thin liquid cement with brush applicator.
- Testors plastic cement with the brush applicator.

Thanks in advance!!
cinzano
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Indiana, United States
Joined: January 13, 2009
KitMaker: 419 posts
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Posted: Friday, April 10, 2009 - 01:51 AM UTC
Be careful that!

Even with a touch-n-flow cement wicks easily. (which is good generally). The last thing you want is Tenax, Ambroid, or liquid cement to wick _under_ the tape and make a mess of your fuse!

I tend to work in sections where I have the option and where the job is large enough.

Cheers,
Fred
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 08:39 AM UTC

Quoted Text

OK HawkeyeV,


I just bought a tube of the 3M Red glazing putty. Its a positively monstrously large tube. I haven't even popped the cap but I have some projects coming up where I'll need to do some filling. I don't want to screw anything up.

So the dumb question: What is the best way to use/apply this stuff?

Cheers,
Fred



Sparingly...several light thin coats. Those who glob it on only find out it takes way too much work to remove it. Gradually build up to get the shape/contour you desire.
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 08:43 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I'm about to attach the fuselage halves and wanted to make sure that I understand the mentioned process and get the best advice that I can. Do you apply the glue to each of the halves and then attach or do you attach the halves and then glue on top of the seam? If you glue on top of the seams, will using tape on top to secure the bond wreak havok with the tape? Also, which adhesive is better to use for this process? I currently have:
- Testors liquid cement with the fine tip applicator.
- Tamiya thin liquid cement with brush applicator.
- Testors plastic cement with the brush applicator.

Thanks in advance!!



I apply it to the seam with the two halves in place. Using the TnF to draw along the seam line dispensing solvent as it travels along the seam. On seams that are particularly needy I go over it a couple of times to ensure enough solvent has wicked its way into the seam cavity. You can tell if you get sufficient oozing once you squeeze the parts together. If you don't get any or enough, just apply more and squeeze again.

On thick plastic it helps if you can apply solvent with the aide of the TnF to the inside of the seam line as well. In some cases this is impossible.
HawkeyeV
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: September 20, 2006
KitMaker: 319 posts
AeroScale: 129 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 - 08:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Gerald,
I`ve been building models for nigh on thirty years and my kits have varied from little gems to real dogs,but i`ve follwed your advice as i work on a 1967 vintage Revell P-40 warhawk and it`s going great.Your advice about not glueing all the way around wings and fuselages in one go to allow things to line up is paying dividends,as i do`nt want to screw up a oldie but goldie.
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK WITH THE THREAD AS IT`S NEVER TOO LATE TO LEARN.



Thanks Danny. I too am always learning about more and sometimes better techniques to improve my builds...I need it! The best part of modeling for me is sharing the skill sets that were shared with me as well as the ones I've developed myself. It is great to see a project turn out that you've built, but it is even better to see someone else have the same success after you shared a few of those "trade secrets" with them.

I refer a lot of newbies of the various forums I follow to this thread...man it went from deadsville to rocksville in the blink. I guess I need to spend more time here.
Easy_Co
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 11, 2002
KitMaker: 1,933 posts
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Posted: Monday, April 27, 2009 - 04:46 AM UTC
I am in need of help,Ive just glued sanded and sanded again the fuselage and wings of the old monogram F105d Thunderchief.I sprayed the underneath and seams have appeared everywhere can this be rectified now its painted without making a pigs ear out of it.(my first attempt at a aircraft)