login   |    register

Scale Modeling Sponsors

See Your Ad Here!

Badger Airbrush [ MORE REVIEWS ] [ WEB SITE ] [ NEW STORIES ]

Tool Review
The Badger Patriot
Model 105 Airbrush
  • move

by: Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]


Originally published on:
KitMaker Network

My view

I have used several airbrushes in my lifetime. Starting with the most basic to the dual action versions. While there are more expensive rigs out there and this on is not cheap, I must say I am impressed. It is the best dual action airbrush that I have ever used. I am a gravity feed painter and that is noting just my preference.

descrition

Essentially this is a gravity feed version of the siphon feed model 155 but with some great innovations. Mine arrived in the mail this past this last Friday and I slated it to be used that following Sunday. I start with some comments from the instruction booklet.

"Patented “Easy Access” needle removal system
Easy maintenance self centering nozzle design
Exacting control for intricate airbrushing detail
Perfect proportion comfort balance system
Parts interchangeability with Badger’s 155, 200 and 360
Innovative precision design, superior performance, and amazing afford ability."

Use & cleaning

The easy needle removal is my favorite option in the maintenance topic. . I regularly take apart my airbrush. And being able to quickly rotate the locking screw, partially remove the needle, and dip the end of the airbrush in thinner is a real plus. It make clean up quick and easy. The 105 /155 needle is moderately priced and easy to pick up at most good local hobby shops. The double-action trigger control has a smooth travel.

When finished I wiped out the cup with a cleaning rag. With a cleaner soaked old brush I wiped it down again. The I refilled the cup with new cleaner, and blew that through. Rock the trigger a few times while shooting the cleaner then add your next colour. The larger opening at the bottom of the cup insures a good shot at thorough cleaning. When I am finished I cleaned the mechanisms and the needle again. To take it apart totally is a snap. No tools or chucks to wrench. Its all done by hand.

helpful tip

The best change is the balance. The gravity feed is my favorite. But with other types it has been a compromise as previously the cup always seemed to get in the way. Now if your use to a syphon feed type and you pick up a gravity you turn your wrist and you spill your mix. This is always a disaster. Badger gives you a vinyl fitted top and opening a pin hole with a small gauge drill bit (76 gauge is good) gives to a breather port.

Why use an airbrush

The purpose of an airbrush in scale modeling is to give you a reasonable representation of a scaled paint scheme. Whether you preshade or not. I was very happy with the amount of paint I could laydown consistantly. Now truthfully this is 60% the paint consistency, 30% the airbrush design and 10% the modeler's ability. If you have an average experience in the first and the last issues the middle is fully met in the Model 105 Patriot. The gravity feed gives you the option to easily use a lower PSI.

When contacting Badger please let them know you heard about their product at Aeroscale.co.uk
SUMMARY
Highs: Simple to use and clean. easy to handle and comfortable to use.
Lows: MSRP is 119.00 USD but we will probably see it at 85.00 - 95.00 USD.
Verdict: I may not need another airbrush. I like this little tool. If you ever decide to get better at your finishes you will only do yourself the greatest favor in getting a Patriot.
  FUNCTION:94%
  EASE OF MAINTENANCE:98%
  PRICE:90%
Percentage Rating
94%
  Scale: Other
  Mfg. ID: Model 105
  Suggested Retail: 119.00 USD
  Related Link: product info
  PUBLISHED: Nov 15, 2009
  NATIONALITY: United States
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 90.95%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 92.69%

Our Thanks to Badger Airbrush!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

View This Item   View Vendor Homepage  More Reviews  

About Stephen T. Lawson (JackFlash)
FROM: COLORADO, UNITED STATES

I was building Off topic jet age kits at the age of 7. I remember building my first WWI kit way back in 1964-5 at the age of 8-9. Hundreds of 1/72 scale Revell and Airfix kits later my eyes started to change and I wanted to do more detail. With the advent of DML / Dragon and Eduard I sold off my ...

Copyright ©2017 text by Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.


Reader Reviews
Do you own this item and want to review it? You can add your review of the item here. Please read the reader review instructions before posting.


Comments

enjoyed reading your review. could you elaborate on this please? :
NOV 16, 2009 - 04:58 AM
Certainly! The most critical and important portion of paint appliction is the consistancy of the paint you are using. Roughly a 2:1 ratio of paint to thinner is needed. Some say the consistancy of milk. It is the one thing that the modeler must get right for the paint to flow through the airbrush and lay down on the kit surface. Even with a great airbrush, if your paint is sludge you will have knackered the whole affair.
NOV 16, 2009 - 12:48 PM
thanks
NOV 16, 2009 - 01:03 PM
Hi Nice Review. very informative.. I'll attest to the basic design of the airbrush. I have been using the Badger 360 for a couple of years and I love it. The one fault with the 360 is the color cup for gravity feed is very small so that it can also accept siphon feed too. In either feed mode it is a great airbrush but what I like about the gravity feed is so little paint seems to go so far. ...the action is smooth and clean up is such a breeze... anyways glad to know there is a new option out there in case I ever decide to upgrade.. laters Delbert
NOV 18, 2009 - 09:44 PM
Tip: Just hit enter to sumbit your reply!
   

What's Your Opinion?


Photos
Click image to enlarge
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move