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In-Box Review
148
R-77/AA-12 Adder
R-77/AA-12 Adder air to air missile
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by: Andy Brazier [ BETHEYN ]

History
The Vympel R-77 missile (NATO reporting name: AA-12 Adder) is a Russian medium range, air-to-air, active radar-guided missile system. It is also known by its export model designation RVV-AE. It is the Russian counterpart to the American AIM-120 AMRAAM missile.
Work on the R-77 began in 1982. It represented Russia's first multi-purpose missile for both tactical and strategic aircraft for fire-and-forget use against a range of aircraft from hovering helicopters to high speed, low altitude aircraft. Gennadiy Sokolovski, general designer of the Vympel Design Bureau, said that the R-77 missile can be used against medium and long range air-to-air missiles such as the AIM-120 AMRAAM and AIM-54 Phoenix, as well as SAMs such as the Patriot. The weapon has a laser fuze and an expanding rod warhead that can destroy the variable sized targets. It can be used against cruise missiles and precision-guided munitions (PGMs). First seen in 1992 at the Moscow Airshow (MAKS) 1992, the R-77 was immediately nicknamed Amraamski by Western journalists. The basic R-77 is known as the izdeliye 170, while the export variant is known as the izdeliye 190, or RVV-AE.
From Wikipedia

In the pack
Packed in Eduardís standard blister pack the 40 dark grey resin parts, one small brass fret, a small decal, and the instructions are well protected with a foam back. Due to the number of resin parts two missiles are packed behind the parts you can see through the blister pack window.
The parts are all attached to pour plugs and care must be taken removing the delicate parts. No discrepancies are in the resin parts.
Each missile is made up of ten resin parts, which comprise the main missile body, four vestigial cruciform wings with four grid fins used as tail control surfaces. A P.E exhaust ring is attached to the back, two extra are supplied. A resin pylon makes up the ten parts.
Detail is good with a mix of recessed and raised areas on the missiles and pylon.
The grid fins have a moulded on grid pattern, and with careful painting and adding washes the detail should stand out.
The small instruction sheet covers the parts count, the build and the decal positioning. Colours needed are given for the Gunze Creos range of paints.
Construction looks fairly straightforward with the only the care of removing parts from the pour plugs to be the most challenging part.
The small decal sheet has the pylon and missiles markings, with each pylon having 2 large decals applied and the missile needing 6 decals.
A decal solution will probably be needed to get the pylon decal to conform to the recessed and raised areas of the pylons.

Please remember, when contacting retailers or manufacturers, to mention that you saw their products highlighted here - on AEROSCALE.
SUMMARY
Highs: Well cast, pretty easy build and decals supplied.
Lows: None really.
Verdict: A nice set of modern missiles for any current Russian Air force fighter aircraft
Percentage Rating
90%
  Scale: 1:48
  Mfg. ID: 648 143
  Suggested Retail: £8.40
  Related Link: R-77/AA-12 Adder
  PUBLISHED: Aug 06, 2014
  NATIONALITY: Russia
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.81%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 88.44%

Our Thanks to Eduard!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Andy Brazier (betheyn)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH EAST, UNITED KINGDOM

I started modelling in the 70's with my Dad building Airfix aircraft kits. The memory of my Dad and I building and painting a Avro Lancaster on the kitchen table will always be with me. I then found a friend who enjoyed building models, and between us I think we built the entire range of 1/72 Airfi...

Copyright ©2019 text by Andy Brazier [ BETHEYN ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.



   

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